Sharpening Stanley 45 blades
#21
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by Timberwolf ([quote='bandit571' p...)
(08-15-2021, 11:54 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: .....................
These work very well.............
https://www.amazon.com/DMT-D2K-Dia-Sharp-Diamond-Mini-Hone/dp/B000S5SD9M/ref=sr_1_9?crid=34EFKLV6PAO6V&dchild=1&keywords=slipstones+for+sharpening&qid=1629046263&sprefix=slipstones%2Caps%2C191&sr=8-9

Yes I am sure they do but a lot of time they are either to big or to small. Or they will not fit every application. and I have a set like them somewhere.

Tom
Reply
#22
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by Timberwolf ([quote='TheCabinetma...)
(08-15-2021, 07:37 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: .........................
For the curved edges I use an appropriate sized cylinder burr in a Dremel, and smoothed up using a burr shaped Bright Boy { rubberized abrasive } also in a Dremel.

I forgot about that, I also use Craytex cylinders in my Foredom flex shaft to hone them.
Captain Kirk was talking about my shop when he said: Space the final frontier!   
Reply
#23
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by Tony Z (Nice set up Tom! ...)
(08-15-2021, 11:38 AM)Tony Z Wrote: Nice set up Tom!  

I have a Worksharp, but only use it on narrow bevels, and for me, it works well.  Don't know if I was holding my tongue wrong or what, but i've had only bad luck on flats.

Some have said put the blade on the plate and then turn it on. Sometimes to course an abrasive can be grabby. Having the wheel spinning into the cutter can be a little more aggressive than rotating away from the blade.
Now that you mention it I think they had a very fine abrasive on the plate at the Woodsmith store. That is why maybe I though it would be good for that type of work and am considering getting one. I have had nothing but bad luck using the side of my tormek wheel. 

I think I have the 80 grit CBN wheel exposed. in the picture and I didn't have a problem doing the flats. I did think it would cut a little faster and with less work if the disc rotated faster. But I can also understand that maybe to faster rotation could also make it produce poorer result if the RPM is to high. This is just my mind working through what you wrote.

Thanks for chiming in on what you have found to be true with the Work sharp. 

Tom
Reply
#24
  Re: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom (I didn't want the hi...)
Personally since I still work part time in a machine shop and have a surface grinder at my disposal. And if I had some 45 cutters I would just block them in on the surface grinder And grind all of them at once. But not everyone has a surface grinder at their disposal. 

I have a lot of experience with a die grinder. I joking say I can grind threads on a welded shaft with one, but not every one has that good of hands ( fine motor skills) and one can ruin a cutter in a heart beat. Knowing how easy it is to ruin a cutter I simply don't grind profiles period. There is always an other option. My thoughts on the matter is if that is what you want to do then go for it. Not my cutter or my problem.

Tom
Reply
#25
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom ([color=#000000]until...)
(08-15-2021, 02:06 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: until I discovered these diamond lapping plates that fit it. I bought several in different grits up to 3,000..The coarser grits are very aggressive,.They are about 8 bucks each from Amazon..and they last a very long time..I have not worn one out yet!!

I kind of looked on Amazon for the lapping plates but I didn't see them but then I am not good at searching. They do sound like a better deal than CBN wheels. I have CBN wheel on my slow speed bench grinder as well. One can use polishing compound on a MDF disc also. How about some numbers or links so we all can look them up.

......................
Tom, this link to Amazon should get you in the right section..lots of choices for sizes and grits..The more expensive discs may have more diamond concentration but I am not really sure about that..I have several brands like Uxcel but can find no fault so far with any of them....They can be used dry but I always use a few drops of oil and let the diamond do the cutting at it's best rate of speed....I think you are correct in that the Worksharp rotates at the proper speed, and I do use a foot switch on most of my sharpeners.Doing this allows me to grip the tool with two hands and not have to use one hand to operate the switch..I always place the tool on the lapping disc before starting the motor and stop the plate before removing the tool..Foot switches are cheap at Harbor Freight and they work just as well as more expensive switches...Diamond paste and/or powder are also cheap at Amazon..A little sure goes a very long way and as we all know, nothing cuts like a diamond!!!...BTW...the discs can be used just like a stationary sharpening stone if one does not have a machine, and there's much more diamond surface available than rectangular diamond hones, and lots cheaper as well..

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=diamond+sharpening+discs&ref=nb_sb_noss_2
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#26
  Re: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom (I didn't want the hi...)
Timberwolf, thanks for that response. It is helpful to me and I am hopping to everyone reading this post and replies. There is nothing worse than flattening on a stone by hand. QuestionBig Grino you have a tormek and if so would you still use a foot switch. I never considered it until now. 

Tom
Reply
#27
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom ([quote='Tony Z' pid=...)
(08-15-2021, 02:40 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: Some have said put the blade on the plate and then turn it on. Sometimes to course an abrasive can be grabby. Having the wheel spinning into the cutter can be a little more aggressive than rotating away from the blade.
Now that you mention it I think they had a very fine abrasive on the plate at the Woodsmith store. That is why maybe I though it would be good for that type of work and am considering getting one. I have had nothing but bad luck using the side of my tormek wheel. 

I think I have the 80 grit CBN wheel exposed. in the picture and I didn't have a problem doing the flats. I did think it would cut a little faster and with less work if the disc rotated faster. But I can also understand that maybe to faster rotation could also make it produce poorer result if the RPM is to high. This is just my mind working through what you wrote.

Thanks for chiming in on what you have found to be true with the Work sharp. 

Tom

Some also use a foot actuated switch to start the Worksharp. For me, how I use it, it does fine.

Back in the mid 1980's, I bought a Delta wet grinder, with a 10" wheel, way too slow for anything. After that, I learned how to use a bench grinder, but today, tools such as the Worksharp add quite a bit of conveinence.
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
www.metaltech-pm.com
Reply
#28
  Re: RE: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom (Timberwolf, thanks f...)
(08-15-2021, 04:04 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: Timberwolf, thanks for that response. It is helpful to me and I am hopping to everyone reading this post and replies. There is nothing worse than flattening on a stone by hand. QuestionBig Grino you have a tormek and if so would you still use a foot switch. I never considered it until now. 

Tom

.....
Tom, you are very welcome...I have been pushing the use of foot switches on this forum for many years now, and I use one on my Veritas MKII, WorkSharp, bandsaw, drill press and a small router, belt grinders, etc.....Presenting the tool to a moving abrasive by hand can be very "tricky", and it takes "hand control" that most skilled machinists have acquired...Foot switches make that task much easier and much more accurate...They can be safer also, because you can stop the tool quickly by just taking your foot off the switch..keeping both your hands available to hold the work. Note that I am recommending the "momentary" type of foot switch,,the user has to keep his/her foot pressed on the switch to keep the motor turning...Step on the switch and the motor starts and it stops when the foot is removed...Kinda like a "dead man" switch... Winkgrin

If I am freehanding a tool on the tormek, I use the footswitch, but I don't find it necessary when using a jig. Handy...but not "necessary" Big Grin
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#29
  Re: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom (I didn't want the hi...)
Never thought of using a foot switch one on a drill press. Both of my main band saws are 229. The only machine I use a foot switch on is this.

   

   

   

Tom
Reply
#30
  Re: Sharpening Stanley 45 blades by tablesawtom (I didn't want the hi...)
Did you build that, Tom? Nice!
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
www.metaltech-pm.com
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.