Couple of electrical questions
#6
  
I want to run power to my tractor / fire wood shed. I have run gray PVC conduit from the meter pole to the side of the shed 18" deep.
1. What size and type of wire do I need for a 100 foot run at 100 amps?

2. Once the wire is in the building I need to run the wires through a stud wall to get to the sub panel. I don't think you can run the 4 separate wire through the studs. running conduit to the sub panel would be quite hard. It is 70 feet in conduit and about 30 feet in the stud wall. Is there a better way to run the wire to the sub panel from the conduit LB on the outside of the building?

3. Can I use a "LB" as a junction box?

I am running 100 amps for future green house.

Electrical is not my strong point, I know just enough to get myself in trouble, but I know I can do this with a little help.

Thanks for any input, Mark
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
20 year cancer survivor
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#7
  Re: Couple of electrical questions by lift mechanic (I want to run power ...)
You can look that up, but I had this done in my house and I can tell you, you're looking at something like 3 copper, 2 aluminum. Depends on the distance.

It has to be in conduit. You can run the pipe the wall and over to the service panel.

The "electricians" will chime in.

If this is not your strong point, I would hire an electrician and make sure its right. You probably need a ground rod for that panel.
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#8
Photo    Re: Couple of electrical questions by lift mechanic (I want to run power ...)
1.  Looks like #3 copper or #1 aluminum.  If you think you can get by with 100  90 Amps you can use 2-2-2-4 aluminum.

   

2.   I would also suggest surface mounting the feeders in conduit to your sub.

3.  Not sure, I will check.   Assuming you ran 1.5” pvc conduit, you will be lucky to get your feeders into the LB.  Consider upsizing your LBs and using reducers to get into the conduit.

Edit: #3.  Yes you can.  But you must follow articles 314.16 and 314.28 wrt box fill and bending space.  If you are trying to splice  #1 aluminum you have to count each part of the spice as a separate conductor, giving at least 8 conductors.
Practically speaking, you may have to upsize the lb several levels. 
 They have Morris connectors that can help streamline the splice some. Give yourself some slack in the lb, make the splice, then take out the slack one conductor at a time.  But better would be a weatherproof box.
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#9
  Re: Couple of electrical questions by lift mechanic (I want to run power ...)
Thanks for the information. I ran 2" gray PVC conduit to the building and mounted a LB on the side of the building. No conduit inside, yet.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
20 year cancer survivor
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#10
  Re: RE: Couple of electrical questions by lift mechanic (Thanks for the infor...)
(08-30-2021, 10:18 AM)lift mechanic Wrote: Thanks for the information. I ran 2" gray PVC conduit to the building and mounted a LB on the side of the building. No conduit inside, yet.

If you haven't poked a hole in the building yet, then I would either run it to the eave, turn 90 degrees and run it to where the panel will be, then poke it through, or do the same inside the building.  If you can.  But I would run that conduit all the way, on the inside or outside of the wall.  You may be able to use cable inside, as long as it's not subject to physical damage.  And not going to get wet, unless it's wet rated.  But that will have to be spliced, in which case I'd probably use a box on the inside rather than trying to splice inside a conduit body (LB in this case) due to fill requirements, as already point out by srv.

You'll need a grounding electrode system, by the way, assuming this is an outbuilding.
Tom

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