refinish table
#7
  
A lady at church has asked me to refinish a table and rocking chair that has been in her family for decades.
The table is a mahogany drop leave that had sat in a window in her parents home for years without being moved. A portion of it has been sun bleached in certain areas while other areas has not been affected. I'm thinking thoroughly sanding and refinish. Or are there other suggestions. What top coat should I use.

The rocking chair is made of RO but was painted in the 1960's & she wants to restore it to the original condition. It has some scrolling that I need to preserve. The construction is solid on both pieces and I don't want to take them apart. What's recommended to remove the paint?

PS: I've tried to post pictures but can't seem to get them small enough.

Jim
Jim
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#8
  Re: refinish table by Halfathumb (A lady at church has...)
As long as the table is solid wood construction then sanding the top/leaves makes good sense to get rid of the sun bleached areas.  However, if it's veneer you won't be able to go that route.  It would require stripping followed by dye/stains to unify the color.  

Your story points out what many folks don't think is possible; the sun will bleach anything organic almost white given enough time.  People think cherry darkens with sun exposure, and it does for awhile, but if you leave it with heavy sun exposure in 10 or so years it will be bleached out nearly white.  

The RO chair is going to be a challenge if the paint was applied to raw wood.  Hopefully, it was varnished first which will provide a barrier against the paint getting into the pores.  In any case, chemical stripper is the way to go.  Take your pick; since they discontinued methylene chloride based ones I'm at a loss as to what to use.  Most any of them should work given a long enough soak, although it may take several applications to get it all off.  If the pores are filled with paint you'll have to apply more and scrub it with a nylon brush after letting it work.   

Good luck.

John
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#9
  Re: refinish table by Halfathumb (A lady at church has...)
   

Thanks John. I think I figured out how to post the pictures

Jim
Jim
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#10
  Re: refinish table by Halfathumb (A lady at church has...)
<p>The table - not much but go ahead and sand as much as you can - don't go crazy of course.&nbsp; I use dyes when I have mismatching.&nbsp; I also use gel stains if the colors aren't too far off.&nbsp; <br><br>The chairs.&nbsp; I like taking things apart when I can - I can really get into the corners.&nbsp; I use the strongest stripper I can find - epoxy stripper.&nbsp; The new ones are not as good as the old ones before reducing VOC's.&nbsp; I use tooth brushes to get into carvings.&nbsp; I it difficult and will take more effort but just apply the stripper and let it sit.&nbsp; I use mineral spirits to clean up the stripper instead of water that many recommend.&nbsp; MS doesn't hurt the wood as water does.&nbsp; <br><br>Oak refinishes well.&nbsp; Once the MS dries - I let it dry a day.&nbsp; I will lightly sand with 300 grit - just to smooth the wood.&nbsp; Most of the time I will also put a stain on - even if it's natural. &nbsp; <br><br><br></p>
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
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#11
  Re: RE: refinish table by John Mihich (The table - not m...)
(09-21-2021, 03:19 PM)John Mihich Wrote: <p>The table - not much but go ahead and sand as much as you can - don't go crazy of course.&nbsp; I use dyes when I have mismatching.&nbsp; I also use gel stains if the colors aren't too far off.&nbsp; <br><br>The chairs.&nbsp; I like taking things apart when I can - I can really get into the corners.&nbsp; I use the strongest stripper I can find - epoxy stripper.&nbsp; The new ones are not as good as the old ones before reducing VOC's.&nbsp; I use tooth brushes to get into carvings.&nbsp; I it difficult and will take more effort but just apply the stripper and let it sit.&nbsp; I use mineral spirits to clean up the stripper instead of water that many recommend.&nbsp; MS doesn't hurt the wood as water does.&nbsp; <br><br>Oak refinishes well.&nbsp; Once the MS dries - I let it dry a day.&nbsp; I will lightly sand with 300 grit - just to smooth the wood.&nbsp; Most of the time I will also put a stain on - even if it's natural. &nbsp;</p><p><br></p><p><br></p><p>Thanks John. I knew I could count on you. You helped me with a project a few years ago as well.</p><p><br></p><p>Jim&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br><br></p>
There doesn't seem to be a top coat on the table so sanding is pretty easy and effective.
Jim
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#12
  Re: refinish table by Halfathumb (A lady at church has...)
I'm fortunate that the veneer on the top is 1/8 thick so sandy went pretty well. However, I'm using Saman wood stain which went on nicely on the lags & aprons but I had trouble getting a smooth coat on the tops. I had to sand them again down to the wood surface and applied the stain again. I think I might have tried to wipe to soon. So now I want to give it several hours to dry and see what that produces w/o wiping. 

Jim
Jim
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