CNC comparison Onefinity vs shark 510
#11
I was kind of all set to pull the trigger on the onefinity when I found a really good deal on a nearly new shark HD510.  I know the seller well and am confident it is in like new condition.  The shark will end up being around $600 more when factoring in shipping for the onefinity.  I will also have to make a base/spoil board for the onefinity.  The shark already has one.  Neither include a router but the shark can use a variety including midsized routers while the onefinity can only be used with the makita trim router.  But in the future I plan on upgrading to a water cooled spindle so I'm not sure it matters.  Any advice from experienced users?

https://www.onefinitycnc.com/product-pag...odworker-1

[Image: f704eb_9012e143af3b42fe89ecd2b89acbba7a~mv2.webp]

https://www.rockler.com/next-wave-shark-hd510

[Image: 65348-01-1000_2.jpg]
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#12
I have not used either product, however I have a DIY CNC.
One of the most important things a CNC needs is rigidity.
The Shark just looks a lot better built.
The Onefinity only supports a palm router, while the Shark can use a midsized router.
That alone tells you the Shark is more rigid.
The Shark should be able to cut faster too.
Less rigid machines need to be slowed down a lot
I am guessing both of them use proprietary control systems.. but please check into that for yourself.
If it was me, I would get the Shark or go DIY CNC..
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#13
I have the onefinity woodworker.  It is my first cnc and I have had it for only a few months so my experience level is definitely in the beginner status. 

I am very happy with the machine so far.

I am a bit surprised by the comment from Paul that the Shark looks like it is built better and that it is more rigid.  I would have said just the opposite, but that is obviously biased because I already made the decision of a Onefinity over a Shark.  Certainly the rigidity of the Onefinity will be somewhat dependent on the structure that you mount it to but the tubular steel rails seem far superior to the flat panels on the sides of the Shark to resist side to side movement.  Additionally, on the Shark you cannot even see the y-axis rails to know how sturdy they are.  I will certainly agree that the Shark has a superior table with the aluminum extrusions.  But you can make the table for the Onefinity as rigid as you want - it is much more difficult to fix the rigidity of the unit itself and I would give that advantage to the Onefinity.

I do not remember, is the Shark belt driven or screw driven.  I think screw driven is far superior and that is what Onefinity is.
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#14
Correcting some bad info..The Onefinity has options for a 65mm mount or an 80 mm mount. The former is used for palm routers and spindles up to ~1.5kw. The latter for spindles up to ~2.2kw

The Onefinity can be purchased with a work area up to 32x48. The Shark looks like it is max 25x25.

Onefinity’s controller is proprietary but based on Buildbotics. You can also elect to provide your own controller.

Onefinity does not include any CAD/CAM software - you need to buy that separately (Vectric, Fusion 360, Carbide Create, Easel, whatever). Shark includes a copy of Vectric Vcarve Desktop which is well regarded and $spendy but it’ll cost $50 to transfer the license IIRC.

Seems like it comes down to whether the larger work envelope is important, the condition of the Shark and the price differential (is the seller throwing in accessories/bits?).

Hey ..is the Shark using a single motor for the Y axis? The Onefinity uses 2. If so the Onefinity probably has the edge in speed and rigidity: 2Y motors, 2 Y leadscrews, 4 sets of linear bearings on the y axis

-Mark, who owns a Onefinity
If I had a signature, this wouldn't be it.
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#15
(10-01-2021, 11:20 AM)MKepke Wrote: Correcting some bad info..The Onefinity has options for a 65mm mount or an 80 mm mount.  The former is used for palm routers and spindles up to ~1.5kw.  The latter for spindles up to ~2.2kw

The Onefinity can be purchased with a work area up to 32x48.  The Shark looks like it is max 25x25.

Onefinity’s controller is proprietary but based on Buildbotics.  You can also elect to provide your own controller.

Onefinity does not include any CAD/CAM software - you need to buy that separately (Vectric, Fusion 360, Carbide Create, Easel, whatever).  Shark includes a copy of Vectric Vcarve Desktop which is well regarded and $spendy but it’ll cost $50 to transfer the license IIRC.

Seems like it comes down to whether the larger work envelope is important, the condition of the Shark and the price differential  (is the seller throwing in accessories/bits?).

Hey ..is the Shark using a single motor for the Y axis?  The Onefinity uses 2.  If so the Onefinity probably has the edge in speed and rigidity: 2Y motors, 2 Y leadscrews, 4 sets of linear bearings on the y axis

-Mark, who owns a Onefinity

Thanks for the corrections and info.  A couple of questions.

Will the 80mm mount work with popular 2-1/4hp routers?  As I said I will eventually get a spindle but for now if I can use one of my mid sized routers that would be great. 

What do you think of the frame/ base sold by onefinity.  Can I build a better one for the price or is this pretty reasonable considering the price and rigidity?  Also where is the stated size.  I was looking at the Woodworker QCW Frame but can find the dimensions.  32x48 I think would be the largest size I can fit in my shop.

https://www.onefinitycnc.com/product-pag...ve-version

No extra accessories come with the shark.  He only has bit and said he will be using those.

I'll have to check the y-axis motors on the shark.


Thanks all for your opinions
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#16
Onefinity sizes.
Surprisingly these don't seem to be on the specifications page.  I had to go the the "shop" page to find them.
Machinist X-35          16"(X)           x   16"(Y)          x   5 1/4"(Z)
Woodworker X-35    32 1/8"(X)     x   32 1/8"(Y)   x   5 1/4"(Z)
Woodworker X-50    32 1/8"(X)     x   32 1/8"(Y)   x  5 1/4"(Z)
Journeyman X-50     48 1/8""(X)   x   32 1/8"(Y)   x   5 1/4"(Z)

The "50" refers to the 50mm diameter of the x-axis tubes along with other upgrades to the x-axis.

Another potential factor in your decision may be when you want it.  Onefinity is claiming that they are backordered 10 weeks out.  (worth the wait in my opinion)
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#17
Ok I think I’ve settled on the onefinity. Just 2 decisions now and wondering if u guys can help with it

1. Should I go with the journeyman or woodworker model. 48” vs 32” capacity. Right now 32” seems fine but I would hate to regret the decision. Have u guys had occasion where you needed the extra capacity.

2. Should I buy the qcw (1f base) or make my own. Would sourcing the individual parts be much more cost effective or will it be about the same. And even if it is the same price could I build something better myself (ur more rigid structure with more holding options)? If I build myself what is a good supplier to source the material.
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#18
#1:
My CNC is a DIY and it's working envelope is 25"+ x 37"+ and I haven't found either dimension very limiting for most of my work. With that I have designed projects that optimize the workpiece to those limits. There are workarounds for items that exceed your machine working area but obviously it's easier to just have a machine with the capacity that best meets your needs. I do make a lot of smaller items AND my shop is smallish so, the working envelope of my machine makes sense for what my needs are. I would love to have a full 4'x8' CNC but my shop won't support that footprint and realistically the type of work I do, does not justify that size machine.

#2:
If you decide to make your own base I would make it out of 80/20 extruded aluminum. Something like 1530 would be ideal... in fact the bulk of my machine is made from 80/20 1530 extrusions.

Lastly, I'll just put my $.02 in that I would consider doing more research and not settling on a machine. I purchased a small light duty kit when I got into the CNC world and ended up in the "upgrade trap" because of the limitations of the machine. The working envelope was too small and the machine wasn't quality. It was serviceable if you used workarounds and weren't in a hurry but it was less than ideal. Rigidity of a CNC is paramount for quality CNC work. If your machine is ridged it will be more accurate, you'll have far less problems and your machine times will be less because you can increase the feed rates. I'm not saying either of the machines your looking at won't meet your needs but understand they may have limitations and will be proprietary to a large extent.
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#19
(10-02-2021, 01:14 PM)Lumber Yard® Wrote: #1:
My CNC is a DIY and it's working envelope is 25"+ x 37"+ and I haven't found either dimension very limiting for most of my work. With that I have designed projects that optimize the workpiece to those limits. There are workarounds for items that exceed your machine working area but obviously it's easier to just have a machine with the capacity that best meets your needs. I do make a lot of smaller items AND my shop is smallish so, the working envelope of my machine makes sense for what my needs are. I would love to have a full 4'x8' CNC but my shop won't support that footprint and realistically the type of work I do, does not justify that size machine.

#2:
If you decide to make your own base I would make it out of 80/20 extruded aluminum. Something like 1530 would be ideal... in fact the bulk of my machine is made from 80/20 1530 extrusions.

Lastly, I'll just put my $.02 in that I would consider doing more research and not settling on a machine. I purchased a small light duty kit when I got into the CNC world and ended up in the "upgrade trap" because of the limitations of the machine. The working envelope was too small and the machine wasn't quality. It was serviceable if you used workarounds and weren't in a hurry but it was less than ideal. Rigidity of a CNC is paramount for quality CNC work. If your machine is ridged it will be more accurate, you'll have far less problems and your machine times will be less because you can increase the feed rates. I'm not saying either of the machines your looking at won't meet your needs but understand they may have limitations and will be proprietary to a large extent.

So your base is also made from 1530?  Do you have any pics you care to share?
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#20
I don't have any pics right now... for an idea of similar designs go to "Avid CNC" (formerly known as CNCRouterparts) The 80/20 "base" is part of the machine framework and a sacrificial spoil board is attached to it.
2021-2022 NFL Pick 'em
Group ID#: 17146
Group Password IBTP
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