Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing)
#9
  
I'm almost done building a staked desk, and my plan is to paint the legs black.  I'm currently debating between the GF milk paint (which I realize isn't actually a milk paint), or more of the traditional powdered/mix it yourself milk paint.  I'm looking for a dark black matte finish.  I have experience using actual milk paint (though it has been a few years), but not the GF.  My main question is which will likely work better if I am worried about runs?  The legs are tapered, octoganally shaped, and angled, so I don't really see a way to paint this horizontally.  My guess is the traditional paint is probably the better choice as I think it would have a quicker drying time, but figured I would check here first.  I'm tempted to try the GF paint, as I think that will not look as chalky as the traditional paint, but not if runs are going to be a major problem.

Thanks in advance.

Mark

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#10
  Re: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by msweig (I'm almost done buil...)
GF's milk paint is easy to apply with a foam brush and it won't run. You can topcoat it with a WB clearcoat of whatever sheen you like.

John
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#11
  Re: RE: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by jteneyck (GF's milk paint is e...)
I did the same thing that John is recommending, although I sprayed on the GF Milk Paint and the clear topcoat.  I would definitely go with the GF and brush it on, rather than "real" milk paint.  Based on my experience (viscosity), i don't believe you will have a problem at all with runs.
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#12
  Re: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by msweig (I'm almost done buil...)
I think everyone should have the powdered black milk paint in their shops. I’ve mixed it into wax, thinned and used it as a glaze to slightly age pieces, and mixed it into other paints. So I think you should buy a sample or a pint and keep it on hand.

For a project like this, if you want to see the grain and experience the full texture, use the powdered stuff. If you want a thicker paint to conceal the grain or defects, use something else.

In terms of drips and runs, the powdered milk paint goes on like a stain, not really a paint. I always rub it out to get that sheen produced, I think uniquely, by the carbon in the black paint. So runs and drips are not really a factor for that paint.

One coat will get a nice finish but for chalk board black, you will need multiple coats. Once coated, it may look chalky. Rub it out with green scotch brite until it has that sheen. Otherwise, you can linseed oil and wax it after the last coat and that gives it an old paint look and takes away the chalkiness.

I think the other stuff has more binders in it that makes it more opaque. And whatever that filler is, I think it’s finer in texture, so it functions as a concealer and rubbing it can make it splotchy as opposed to translucent.

I think the answer to your question is you need to try both.
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#13
  Re: RE: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by adamcherubini (I think everyone sho...)
(10-24-2021, 08:20 AM)adamcherubini Wrote: I think everyone should have the powdered black milk paint in their shops. I’ve mixed it into wax, thinned and used it as a glaze to slightly age pieces, and mixed it into other paints. So I think you should buy a sample or a pint and keep it on hand.

For a project like this, if you want to see the grain and experience the full texture, use the powdered stuff. If you want a thicker paint to conceal the grain or defects, use something else.

In terms of drips and runs, the powdered milk paint goes on like a stain, not really a paint. I always rub it out to get that sheen produced, I think uniquely, by the carbon in the black paint. So runs and drips are not really a factor for that paint.

One coat will get a nice finish but for chalk board black, you will need multiple coats.  Once coated, it may look chalky. Rub it out with green scotch brite until it has that sheen. Otherwise, you can linseed oil and wax it after the last coat and that gives it an old paint look and takes away the chalkiness.

I think the other stuff has more binders in it that makes it more opaque. And whatever that filler is, I think it’s finer in texture, so it functions as a concealer and rubbing it can make it splotchy as opposed to translucent.

I think the answer to your question is you need to try both.

Adam,  I agree that folks should try both, but the GF milk paint will leave a nice surface that the grain can be seen through.  Of course, if your using maple or poplar, both types will pretty much cover up the grain.  

I have also made my own milk paint using plain unflavored casein protein powder, lime and pigments.  My homemade milk paint worked better then either of the two commercially available milk paints.  I suspect that they are using a whey protein base on how the paints burnish, but not for sure.
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#14
  Re: RE: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by Scoony ([quote="adamcherubin...)
Ok, bought some of the GF to try out.  It is definitely different than the powdered stuff.  In this situation I think I'm better off with the GF (I have a defect I need to hide), but I can totally see how each of these have their place.

Also, after I got the table together, and the BLO on the top (cherry), I was doubting a bit if I wanted to actually end up painting the legs black.  I like the lighter color of the legs (but poplar isn't really ideal for this, particularly as I had mineral stains on a couple spots).  So I ended up completely covering one leg and corresponding end of the batten in blue tape, then painted the tape.  Really easy way to get an idea of what it would look like.  I ended up liking the look, but it felt kinda weird pulling off all the tape/paint
Laugh

The random chunk of wood was a piece of scrap I put some facets on so I could see how much the black hid the shape (before I had the tape idea)
   

The black on the end of the batten looks a bit off because I ended up needing to put a new piece of tape on and just used a black sharpie.  Which apparently isn't as black as the paint...
   

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#15
  Re: RE: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by msweig (Ok, bought some of t...)
I think it's going to look pretty sharp when you're done.  You can add a clearcoat over the GF Milk Paint to give you any sheen you want, as well as more protection. 

John
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#16
  Re: Milk paint question (GF/acrylic vs. real thing) by msweig (I'm almost done buil...)
That is really looking sharp.
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