Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival
#21
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
Is that right hand thread (standard thread, nut gets tighter when turned to the right), or left hand?
Reply
#22
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
Hmm...did Stanley even USE standard threads on their products back then? 
Confused

And....you MIGHT check out a blade for a No. 80, or No. 80M....as I seem to recall it was the same ones used in the scraper planes?

McMaster-Carr MIGHT have those threaded wheels you need...
Winkgrin
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
Reply
#23
  Re: RE: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Bill_Houghton (Is that right hand t...)
(11-08-2021, 09:27 AM)Bill_Houghton Wrote: Is that right hand thread (standard thread, nut gets tighter when turned to the right), or left hand?

I am ashamed to admit I don't know how to answer your question.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
"Life is too short for bad tools.".-- Pedder 7/22/11
Reply
#24
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
That's right hand thread.

Right hand thread is the most common, and you can tell by placing yourself (physically or in your head) directly facing the end of the threaded rod/bolt/etc.  If, when you turn the nut to the right, it moves away from you on the rod, it's right hand thread.  If toward you, it's left hand.

If you were putting the nut on the end of that rod, again looking directly at the end of the rod, you would tighten up the rod to the hole in the casting; thus the basic mantra taught child mechanics in my youth, "Righty tighty, lefty loosey."
Reply
#25
  Re: RE: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Bill_Houghton (That's right hand th...)
(11-08-2021, 10:59 PM)Bill_Houghton Wrote: That's right hand thread.

Right hand thread is the most common, and you can tell by placing yourself (physically or in your head) directly facing the end of the threaded rod/bolt/etc.  If, when you turn the right to the right, it moves away from you on the rod, it's right hand thread.  If toward you, it's left hand.

If you were putting the nut on the end of that rod, again looking directly at the end of the rod, you would tighten up the rod to the hole in the casting; thus the basic mantra taught child mechanics in my youth, "Righty tighty, lefty loosey."

Thanks.  I appreciate the explanation.
"Life is too short for bad tools.".-- Pedder 7/22/11
Reply
#26
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
You could save time, though perhaps not money (but you'd save time!), by asking around the online tool sellers.  I've had good experiences with Pete Niederberger: pniederber@aol.com.  His prices are reasonable, and he's quick to respond.
Reply
#27
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
Thanks for the suggestion  but I plan on doing it myself. It will be a good excuse (I also have a 5/16 24 nut to tap) to show my kids how that is done. Granted..  I have only done it once.
"Life is too short for bad tools.".-- Pedder 7/22/11
Reply
#28
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
I've got the brass adjusting nut from a Stanley No. 9-1/2 or thereabouts block plane, Look at the back of this here plane.  The shaft on which it runs is left hand thread and slightly over 1/4"; I think there might be enough metal there to tap out to 5/16"-18.  If you're interested, I could mail it to you to try.
Reply
#29
  Re: RE: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Bill_Houghton (I've got the brass a...)
(11-11-2021, 10:50 PM)Bill_Houghton Wrote: I've got the brass adjusting nut from a Stanley No. 9-1/2 or thereabouts block plane, Look at the back of this here plane.  The shaft on which it runs is left hand thread and slightly over 1/4"; I think there might be enough metal there to tap out to 5/16"-18.  If you're interested, I could mail it to you to try.

I sincerely appreciate it but I have the same nut and the same plan already.  Great minds think alike.
"Life is too short for bad tools.".-- Pedder 7/22/11
Reply
#30
  Re: Found a new tool today at the "Carolina Pickers" fall festival by Scott W (Never been there bef...)
Good.

If you find yourself wondering how to grip it, and if you have a metalworking vise in your shop but don't have suitable soft jaws for it, grab a scrap of hardwood (roughly 1" by 2" by 4-6", but exact dimensions not important; birch ideal, but whatever you've got) and either drill a hole the diameter of the nut (if it happens to be a diameter for which you've got a bit) or lay out and cut out a square, oriented as a diamond shape relative to the length/width of the scrap, on the scrap that's the size of the nut (that is, each side of the square is equal to the diameter of the nut); then slit the scrap along the grain through the center of the circle/diamond.  Don't use your finest saw blade; you want the slit to be wide enough that the opening can close down on the nut. Slitting it not quite all the way the length of the scrap will make it easier to put the nut in the hole and clamp the scrap in the vise, closing up the slit and trapping the nut.  That should allow you to tap the hole without damaging the knurling.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.