Downsizing table saw
#21
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
None of my business but I think if you do muchf work with your Unisaw, you will regret that choice. A cabinet saw may not cut wood much better but they are so much nicer to use. I was amazed when I went from a contractors saw to the Unisaw. Just much more pleasurable to use.

As others have said, without the side tables you can't get much smaller than a Unisaw.

With a good mobile base you can move it effortlessly. I prefer my machines stationary but had to move my shop and just put mine on a Bora mobile base and I am amazed at how easy it is to move around.
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#22
  Re: RE: Downsizing table saw by Kudzu (None of my business ...)
(11-14-2021, 09:06 AM)Kudzu Wrote: With a good mobile base you can move it effortlessly. I prefer my machines stationary but had to move my shop and just put mine on a Bora mobile base and I am amazed at how easy it is to move around.

Heck, I have the 51" side table with Biesemeyer fence, but only the little square mobile base for the base of the cabinet, and it still moves around relatively easily.  I didn't want the long base, as at my last house I had to put it away with a mountain of stuff under that table, and it slid into place like a Chinese puzzle.  I just have to tweak the leg adjustment after moving it, but that takes seconds. 

For the OP, I would be very cautious about saws with 'special' motors.  So many people have posted here with motor problems in saws that don't use NEMA frame motors.  I know, Unisaws have special frames too, with an odd shaft size, but new and used motors are all over the place, so no worries there.  But some of those hybrid types use purpose built motors that can be difficult to replace, rendering the whole saw useless if one can't be sourced. 

At least a conventional contractor saw uses a NEMA 56 frame motor typically, and they're everywhere, in numerous power ratings.  If storage space is an issue, remove the motor when putting it away.  That's what made them contractor's saws in the first place, long ago - they come apart for transport (sort of).
Tom

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#23
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
In Europe (and more and more in the USA), Festool track saw + Festool router have replaced much of the table saw operations.

Where it does not do well is ripping narrow strips.

Mafell Erika, is a table saw with sliding blade capability.  It will replace your table saw and your miter saw.  It is pricy, but it is supposed to be excellent.

https://youtu.be/cZpQVjjtTrM

I added a Festool track saw to my equipment.  I originally intended it to cut to near size with the final cuts being made on the table saw.  But over time I have gained confidence and I bring home the sheet goods, roll them from my van and onto saw horses and cut to final size on the driveway.  Small, easy to carry pieces to bring down to the basement and ready to assemble. 

But I did not sell my table saw, my miter saw or my radial arm saw, though those pieces are seeing far less use lately. 

The Festool router would eliminate the need for a dado head. 

But it still would not solve the narrow rip limitations of the track saw.
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#24
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
I bought a track saw hoping to be able to replace my table saw as well.  I found that working with irregular shaped pieces was pretty much a no go as well with a track saw. Pretty much anything that is not flat and square. If there is a way to do it, I'd love to see it though.
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#25
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
Festool Owners Group (FOG) forums are excellent for learning more about how to use the track saw.  There are work-arounds for the odd shaped and narrow strip cuts.  But none are particularly elegant. 

Mostly I use the table saw to cut the dado for rear panels on cabinets.  Two passes with a regular combination blade is quick and easy.  I could do that with a router and an edge guide, but the table saw is quicker. 

I have three tracks (that can be joined) and a parallel edge guide that allows very accurate and repeatable cuts up to 24".  I don't have a miter attachment and I would not need it for the cabinet work that I usually do.

But if I moved to Florida and could not set up a full-time shop, I would find a way to get work done with the track saw and a track-mounted router.  Where I live now the snow and the cold will limit the time I want to work outdoors.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#26
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
You mentioned you're a senior. So am I. After one "close call" due to my own mental mistake, the very next day I put both my table saws up for sale and bought a SawStop.

I bought it more for my wife than myself.

The SS jobsite saw with stand is $1600. At least think about it.

A Festool track saw and full MFT table set up with a dust extractor is going to cost more than $1600.

Check Peter Millard's channel on YouTube. He has the typical euro "non-table saw" type shop.
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#27
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
"In Europe (and more and more in the USA), Festool track saw + Festool router have replaced much of the table saw operations."

I couldn't see getting rid of the tablesaw now that I have a track saw. However, the 48" capacity of my saw is probably no longer needed.
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#28
  Re: RE: Downsizing table saw by rwe2156 (You mentioned you're...)
(11-15-2021, 10:27 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: You mentioned you're a senior.  So am I.  After one "close call" due to my own mental mistake, the very next day I put both my table saws up for sale and bought a SawStop.

I bought it more for my wife than myself.

The SS jobsite saw with stand is $1600.  At least think about it.

A Festool track saw and full MFT table set up with a dust extractor is going to cost more than $1600.

Check Peter Millard's channel on YouTube.  He has the typical euro "non-table saw" type shop.
I'm 73 and safety was the overriding factor in getting the Festool.  Aside from ease in carrying it down the stairs, cutting full sheets on the table saw always seemed risky.  I'm happy with the track saw.  Like Millard, my work is mostly cabinet-style construction.  My "furniture" is basically robustly constructed cabinets masquerading as furniture.  So this system works for me.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#29
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
"cutting full sheets on the table saw always seemed risky. I'm happy with the track saw."

I'm a big guy and only 40. I still would try to avoid full sheets on the tablesaw. I didn't think it was risky with the outfeed table and some roller stands, but it was still a pain in the rear to do.

Before I had the track saw, I'd usually cut 1" larger than needed with a cordless circular saw, then make the final cuts on the tablesaw.
Project Blog Got it all up-to-date, and I promise to keep it up-to-date.
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#30
  Re: Downsizing table saw by Foss (Hi all, I'm a sen...)
If you get inventive you can do interesting things on a tracksaw. 

I put together a custom tracksaw setup using a kreg table (love the knockdown) a makita saw and a metabo 1500mm track

I drilled custom holes into the track to use the track alignment hinge things on the table.  Its fantastic (the kreg stuff is backwards and you lose compatibility with other addons)

Picked up a router guide from Bosh.

I moved and have no shop currently, but wanted a couple custom pieces of furniture for the new place.  So I invested in the tracksaw setup which fit well in part of the garage and collapsed down and stored up against the wall.

I was making a small side table and wanted double taper legs so I took all the protrusions off my tablesaw taper jig and set it up with the leg stock with a spacer behind it and found some good positions for the dog stops and cut 4 legs (technically 5 but I learned a lot on that one) without issue.  Used the cutoff from the taper to wedge the stock back level and secure for the 2nd pass.

Not quite as fast as the tablesaw would have been but I wasn't exactly rushing the project either.
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