Shop Lighting
#21
  Re: Shop Lighting by Oldwood2409 (I am in the final pr...)
I just built a new shop and did a lot research on lighting and how much light. Very hard to get what I felt was reliable answers but I settled on LED fixtures and I have (6) 5,000 K, 100 watt/15,000 lumen light fixtures covering 560 square feet. That is 160.7 lumens per square foot

If my math is right that is 1,193 foot candles per fixture.  That works out to 12.79 Foot candles per square foot?? (Maybe that is 127.9? )I am confused on the differences so I question my math. 

I guess this is very subjective but it is close to daylight levels in there. Walking in from outside on all but the brightest days there isn't a really noticeable difference. I am extremely happy with the light levels and when I build my next one I am going to shot for this level of light.

My last shop felt well lit but this is so much better. I can work the garage door open and in is much better walking in and out or even working in the door where you have both sources of light. In my last shop I often had to close the door because of the difference in the light level. Just to hard on the eyes constantly adjusting.

As others have implied I think the higher level are a very good choice.
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#22
  Re: Shop Lighting by Oldwood2409 (I am in the final pr...)
I have three continuous lines of 2 bulb T8 fluorescent fixtures spaces 8' feet apart.

As the ballasts die, I have been replacing the T8s with "direct replacement" LED bulbs.  The "direct replacement" is misleading.  Yes, the bulbs fit where the older fluorescent bulbs did, but you first have to bypass and remove the old ballast. 

It is not a difficult process, but it does take a bit of time--about 10 to 15 minutes per light fixture.  Assuming you don't have to take them down to work on them.  Longer times should be figured if you have to remove the fixture from the ceiling. 

But the lights work well (I got Phillips bulbs from Amazon.com).  It comes with safety stickers reminding you that the fixture no longer accepts fluorescent bulbs.
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#23
  Re: RE: Shop Lighting by Philip1231 (Fred: you mean somet...)
(11-19-2021, 07:21 AM)Philip1231 Wrote: Fred: you mean something like this?

No, I have the tube type LEDs. I tried to post a pic but can't seem to get it small enough.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#24
  Re: Shop Lighting by Oldwood2409 (I am in the final pr...)
One shot?

Put in a bunch, make them both dimmable and programmable.  Then you can adjust both output and color.

Doesn't cost that much more  nowadays.
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#25
  Re: RE: Shop Lighting by fredhargis ([quote="Philip1231" ...)
(11-19-2021, 12:15 PM)fredhargis Wrote: No, I have the tube type LEDs. I tried to post a pic but can't seem to get it small enough.

In case it's still not clear, I'm pretty sure fredhargis is suggesting installing regular wall outlets in the ceiling.  The LED shop lights often plug into an outlet rather than being hardwired.  Many also allow you to daisy chain them.

I installed outlets in my ceiling rather than hardwiring fixtures and it has worked out well.  It makes it easy to change the configuration.

Mark
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#26
  Re: RE: Shop Lighting by MarkWells ([quote="fredhargis" ...)
(11-20-2021, 04:28 PM)MarkWells Wrote: In case it's still not clear, I'm pretty sure fredhargis is suggesting installing regular wall outlets in the ceiling.  The LED shop lights often plug into an outlet rather than being hardwired.  Many also allow you to daisy chain them.

I installed outlets in my ceiling rather than hardwiring fixtures and it has worked out well.  It makes it easy to change the configuration.

Mark

Yes, that is indeed what I was suggesting. I still can't figure out why I can't post a pic, the file is only 336 KB according to my computer.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#27
  Re: RE: Shop Lighting by fredhargis ([quote="MarkWells" p...)
(11-21-2021, 06:26 AM)fredhargis Wrote: Yes, that is indeed what I was suggesting. I still can't figure out why I can't post a pic, the file is only 336 KB according to my computer.

Gotta be less than 100kb doesn't it?
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#28
  Re: RE: Shop Lighting by KC ([quote="fredhargis" ...)
(11-21-2021, 07:27 AM)KC Wrote: Gotta be less than 100kb doesn't it?

The message says 1000KB.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#29
  Re: Shop Lighting by Oldwood2409 (I am in the final pr...)
Whatever you put in you need to be able to torque it back to something similar to the room a piece of furniture will live in. If you stain wood, mix custom colors, etc. you could end up with shocking results when you move the piece into your living room or whatever room in the house it might occupy.
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#30
  Re: Shop Lighting by Oldwood2409 (I am in the final pr...)
When I rewired the lighting in my old garage shop, I went with T8 daylight (6500K) fluorescent fixtures. I used the daylight color because I wanted to make sure that the finishes I used would appear like they would in natural daylight. You'd be amazed how different colors appear between your shop and the final display place of your handiwork, and it's due to the different light sources. I had a 4-bulb fixture about every 6 feet in the shop. Maybe 12 fixtures or so in a 3 car garage. Don't skimp on your lights. Get the commercial quality fixtures and you will have fewer problems. LED's are much more durable than fluorescents, and will consume less energy. Most workplaces use daylight temp fluorescents in office spaces - any other color tends to cause mood issues.
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