Interior door finishing stands?
#11
I will be finishing 12 interior doors with Arm-R-Seal over Alder. I can apply the finish to 2 doors at a time, that is all the room I have. I saw some plastic triangles that you screw to the top and bottom of the door rails. Once you finish one side you flip over, the triangles rotate over as you turn them the door over. I am thinking of making 8 of them out of 18mm plywood cut offs.
I am open to other suggestions as to applying finish to both sides at the same time.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
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#12
Are you referring to the plastic triangle gizmos that allow for stacking?

All I do is drill a couple pilot holes on the top and bottom of each of the side the rails. Then screw a 6" lag bolt about 1.5" into each hole. Rested the door/bolts on saw horses and it was easy to flip them over. My doors were hollow core, so pretty light weight...
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#13
The painters stood all the doors upright and nailed a furring strip across the top and bottom and positioned the doors in a zig-zag pattern for spraying.  This will probably take up the least amount of space and allow you to wipe on the finish on both sides.
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#14
I spray so not sure how well this will work for wiping but I use these homemade "points".

I set three of them out per door and set the back side on them.

I use two saw horses.  On the first saw horse I have a clean block of wood smaller than the door (never get finish on this block) and on the second I have three of these "points".  My process is to set the door good face down on a the block of wood on saw horse #1.  Spray the back side (not the edges).  I then touch the edges to flip it over onto three "points" on saw horse #2.  Spray the good side and the edges.  Then I use the sticks in the picture to pick it up and transfer it to three "points" in another room where I let it completely cure.  You have to look very hard at the backside of the door to see any defects from where the "points" supported the door while it dried.

You might have to look closely to see it, but the sticks have two screws in that bottom plate that enter from the bottom side.  These act as "points" once again to allow you to transfer the door without any finger prints.

   





edit : My apologies. I reread the original post and realized you are talking about full sized passage doors, not cabinet doors. For those I do as Joe mentioned and put two long deck screws in the top and bottom of the door leaving the screws sticking out about 2" or so and suspend them across two saw horses. Do one side, flip it over using the screws as handles and do the other side. Then carry them to another location and set the screws on two 2x4's lying on edge spaced accordingly. No one can ever see the top and bottom edge of the door after it is hung so the screw holes don't matter.
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#15
I do the same as Joe except I only put one screw in one end of the door.  That allows me to turn the door over by myself.  Pick up the end with the two screws, rotate, set it back down.  

John
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#16
(12-05-2021, 12:53 AM)lift mechanic Wrote: I will be finishing 12 interior doors with Arm-R-Seal over Alder. I can apply the finish to 2 doors at a time, that is all the room I have. I saw some plastic triangles that you screw to the top and bottom of the door rails. Once you finish one side you flip over, the triangles rotate over as you turn them the door over. I am thinking of making 8 of them out of 18mm plywood cut offs.
I am open to other suggestions as to applying finish to both sides at the same time.

Same concept as some others have described, but the trick I saw on (I think) a Youtube video- drywall screw in bottom of door on both sides, paint stirrer with drywall screw in the center on top of door, lean door upright against wall, spray one side and flip to do other. Works great if you're spraying, probably too wobbly if you're brushing. You can expand on this concept and make it better, but this is how I did a bunch of doors at my house and it worked great.
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#17
Thank you everyone for the ideas. The screws in the top and bottom and saw horses sounds the easiest.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
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#18
Nail a 2’ piece of scrap wood that’s 3/4” thick—and narrower than the thickness of the door—to the top of the door. Lean the door with the scrap piece resting on a wall at a slight angle. Hang a tarp to protect your wall. Space the doors 3’ apart like angled dominoes so you have room to access all sides, including hinged and lock mortised sides. Spray away carefully. This isn’t a bomb proof solution but it works.


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#19
https://forums.woodnet.net/showthread.php?tid=7356193
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#20
At first, I also wanted to make doors for our house, but it turned out to be a really difficult task. Now I understand why custom doors cost so much money. To do it, you need not only to know the right size buy expensive material, but you also have to cut beautifully on wood so that the door really fits the design. Therefore, my final decision was to order doors from belldinni.com because I know that there are good-quality doors that will fit perfectly into the design of my house. It would be interesting to find out where you ordered your doors if you failed to make them.
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