How to rout the groove in a cutting board?
#11
  
Hi,

I'm building 2 cutting boards as Christmas gifts and I want to rout the groove that runs around the top side, maybe 3/4'-1" in from the edge to catch any liquid.  I've got the bit, but I'm wondering the best way is to rout it.  Here are the 2 options that I came up with (with the pros/cons of each)

1) Use the PC jig set 3/4"-1" away from the bit and run it around the board.  Of course this would work fine for the rounded one as it'll follow the curve, but on the straight one I guess I'd need to start/stop it on each side.  If I do it freehand (with the jig) as I approach the end of one cut it might burn a bit as I creep up on it.

I would take off that piece of wood I have attached to the jig beforehand.

2) Set the bit in my router table and simply drop the curved board over the spinning bit and them run it around.  Only issue is that when I approach the curve, I need to make sure the router bit opening in my router fence isn't too wide to ensure bit maintains the same distance from the edge. (did that make sense?).  For the straight-edged cutting board, I would mark the starting point/ending point of the groove back on the fence and cut to it.  Or I could clamp starting and ending blocks to the fence.  Again their might be some burning issues as I approach the end of the cut, but I don't see how I can avoid that.


How would you rout the groove that runs around a cutting board.


(on the bottom of both I'll rout grooves so you can pick it up).


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Dumber than I appear
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#12
  Re: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm building ...)
Are you set on it? Cutting boards are the thing I make more than anything else and I find juice grooves not worth the squeeze (pardon the pun). A "standard" size is 12x18, and an "XL" might be 13x22. If you rout a 3/4" groove around the board 3/4" in, your effective board size is reduced to 9x15 (not very big) or 10x19. It has a significant impact on the usable board space. In my own experience (I use two boards I've made) I have never had an overflow, even with wet vegetables or a large roast. So they're not really necessary.

That said, the best option is going to be a simple jig. For me that is a box - use spacers on the outside of the cutting board and then build a simple box to create the offset you want. Then run it around the outside. The bit rotation should make it very difficult to screw up on the inside. This is very similar to what I use:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JpyX_jpcxM
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#13
  Re: RE: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by FS7 (Are you set on it? C...)
(12-14-2021, 09:24 AM)FS7 Wrote: Are you set on it? Cutting boards are the thing I make more than anything else and I find juice grooves not worth the squeeze (pardon the pun). A "standard" size is 12x18, and an "XL" might be 13x22. If you rout a 3/4" groove around the board 3/4" in, your effective board size is reduced to 9x15 (not very big) or 10x19. It has a significant impact on the usable board space. In my own experience (I use two boards I've made) I have never had an overflow, even with wet vegetables or a large roast. So they're not really necessary.

That said, the best option is going to be a simple jig. For me that is a box - use spacers on the outside of the cutting board and then build a simple box to create the offset you want. Then run it around the outside. The bit rotation should make it very difficult to screw up on the inside. This is very similar to what I use:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JpyX_jpcxM

FS7, you know. I go back and forth on whether or not I should make a juice groove.  SWMBO says I should incorporate one...me????...I'm not so sure.

But I did bookmark that video.  If I do it, I think that's the route I'll go.  Thanks!
Dumber than I appear
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#14
  Re: RE: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack ([quote="FS7" pid="80...)
(12-14-2021, 09:48 AM)Dumb_Polack Wrote: FS7, you know. I go back and forth on whether or not I should make a juice groove.  SWMBO says I should incorporate one...me????...I'm not so sure.

But I did bookmark that video.  If I do it, I think that's the route I'll go.  Thanks!

Last one I made with a groove convinced me never to do it again, as there are always "issues" with the corners, be it burn, or "excursion variations" (e.g., I slipped a little with the jig) and with the latter I had to increase the width of the groove to fix the error.  So at least for me its not worth the pain.
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Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#15
  Re: RE: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Admiral ([quote="Dumb_Polack"...)
I put a juice groove on one side of the board, none on the other side; best of both worlds.  I find the groove to be very helpful in keeping juices contained when carving a whole turkey or roast.  

The best way I've found for making juice grooves is to make a template that fits over your cutting board with the cutout where you want the groove.  Then use a collet on the router to follow the template.  Make the last pass 1/32" or so and do not stop; that's the key to avoid burning.  

John
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#16
  Re: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm building ...)
(12-14-2021, 09:17 AM)Dumb_Polack Wrote: 1) Use the PC jig set 3/4"-1" away from the bit and run it around the board.  Of course this would work fine for the rounded one as it'll follow the curve, but on the straight one I guess I'd need to start/stop it on each side.  If I do it freehand (with the jig) as I approach the end of one cut it might burn a bit as I creep up on it.

I sincerely hope you do the template with the collar (or pattern bit). I think you will be extremely frustrated trying to go around the corner with the fence.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#17
  Re: RE: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by fredhargis ([quote="Dumb_Polack"...)
(12-14-2021, 10:52 AM)fredhargis Wrote: I sincerely hope you do the template with the collar (or pattern bit). I think you will be extremely frustrated trying to go around the corner with the fence.

 I think I'll follow the jig shown in the video.  Seemed pretty slick
Dumber than I appear
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#18
  Re: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm building ...)
(12-14-2021, 09:17 AM)Dumb_Polack Wrote: Hi,

I'm building 2 cutting boards as Christmas gifts and I want to rout the groove that runs around the top side, maybe 3/4'-1" in from the edge to catch any liquid.  I've got the bit, but I'm wondering the best way is to rout it.  Here are the 2 options that I came up with (with the pros/cons of each)

1) Use the PC jig set 3/4"-1" away from the bit and run it around the board.  Of course this would work fine for the rounded one as it'll follow the curve, but on the straight one I guess I'd need to start/stop it on each side.  If I do it freehand (with the jig) as I approach the end of one cut it might burn a bit as I creep up on it.

I would take off that piece of wood I have attached to the jig beforehand.

2) Set the bit in my router table and simply drop the curved board over the spinning bit and them run it around.  Only issue is that when I approach the curve, I need to make sure the router bit opening in my router fence isn't too wide to ensure bit maintains the same distance from the edge. (did that make sense?).  For the straight-edged cutting board, I would mark the starting point/ending point of the groove back on the fence and cut to it.  Or I could clamp starting and ending blocks to the fence.  Again their might be some burning issues as I approach the end of the cut, but I don't see how I can avoid that.


How would you rout the groove that runs around a cutting board.


(on the bottom of both I'll rout grooves so you can pick it up).

I just made two cutting boards.  16 x 24".  I put a 3/4" juice groove on them.  I built the jig shown in the above video.  The main thing is to practice with the router off.  Go clockwise around the jig.  Turn the speed down to prevent burning.  Do not stop, but if you do, don't remove the router.  I had very slight burning (purple heart).  The corners can be a problem.  Keep the pressure on the inside when making the turn.
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#19
  Re: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm building ...)
Did this several years ago to add juice grooves to a very large cutting board.
Built a jig to contain my router and then cut the "long" sides, adjusted the
jig and then cut the "short" sides. Could probably have done it as in the video,
but the truth is, I am not that fond of routers in the first place and rarely use
mine. So I made the jig so that it could only go where I wanted it to!

The cutting board owner wanted a "collection" area at one corner.
(To sop up the juices occasionally while cutting) That took a bit more doing but
it came out well.
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
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#20
  Re: How to rout the groove in a cutting board? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm building ...)
I would make a template out of 1/2" thick MDF and then use a bushing to cut the groove.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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