Experimental walnut epoxy/live edge table
#13
  Re: Experimental walnut epoxy/live edge table by FS7 (I have never done on...)
Having never done this before, I think you did a great job.

Having said that, and knowing that after all those hours invested you are probably just happy to be done with it, I'll add this. The seam in the middle would bother me to no end. My eye is drawn to it and it takes away from the fantastic job you did on the rest. I would consider going back in and adding some sort of diagonal or curveing inlay across that seam. You could use epoxy again or a contrasting wood.

Just a suggestion.
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#14
  Re: RE: Experimental walnut epoxy/live edge table by Terry W (Having never done th...)
(01-12-2022, 09:58 AM)Terry W Wrote: Having never done this before, I think you did a great job.

Having said that, and knowing that after all those hours invested you are probably just happy to be done with it, I'll add this. The seam in the middle would bother me to no end. My eye is drawn to it and it takes away from the fantastic job you did on the rest. I would consider going back in and adding some sort of diagonal or curveing inlay across that seam. You could use epoxy again or a contrasting wood.

Just a suggestion.

Yes, if it wasn't clear from the original, I won't do this again. It doesn't bother me enough to hide it, but it does draw the eye (and not in a good way). I think another part of it would be the difficulty - epoxy won't stick well to epoxy, and I think it would be rather wasteful to create an 18" strip of wood in a similar grain direction. Although something like wenge I think would look much nicer.

What do you mean by curved inlay? I've done several of these on cutting boards and I can't see how they would work to hide that joint. Based on what I've done they would just swirl around it, and that doesn't even consider wood movement. For what it's worth I've tried a few different times to do cross-grain inlays (granted, on cutting boards, which do see a lot more moisture and are not sealed) and what I thought might work - one piece being a lot stronger and able to resist movement from the other - has never worked. I ended up with a few potato chips that I had to disassemble and fix.

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