How To secure dust catcher liner?
#21
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
Yes, the problems mentioned are for cyclones of the pull-through type with the bag on the low pressure side. Trapped air below the bag will expand as pressure decreases. A loose bag can be pulled into the cyclone. Holding it in place until pressure decreases both above and below the bag lets it behave as desired.
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#22
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
I have a similar problem with my house central vacuum system. I just drop a piece of scrap wood in the bottom when I replace the bag. It is enough to hold the plastic bag down and the scrap just gets thrown out with the bag.

As someone mentioned above, for a shop DC system, I think the idea of taking a shovel full of dust from the full bag and putting into the new bag sounds like a good easy solution. My shop DC doesn't work that way. So, I can't test it.
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#23
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
That didn't work for me (the shovel of dust thing). Maybe if you filled it up about 1/4, but a shovel full doesn't have the needed weight. Still, it might be dependent on how much DC you have, so it's worth a try.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#24
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
(12-28-2021, 11:53 PM)lift mechanic Wrote: I use a 55 gal drum to collect the dust below the Oneida Super Dust Deputy. I would like to put a heavy duty trash can liner in the drum. How would you secure the liner in the drum so it would not get sucked up into the cyclone? The top of the liner would be secured by the lid on the drum.

I bought a used Oneida cyclone system some years ago sort of as a basket case, a bunch of parts, ducting ...etc..  Among the parts was a small vacuum pump that I later learned was used to keep a trash liner sucked into the fiber pac barrel. I swapped out the original drum to use a 55 gal drum and didn't use a liner, so didn't need the vacuum pump. Unfortunately, I gave the pump away to someone who did need it, but I think Oneida still offers the part.
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#25
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
I think I will try a piece of 24" sono tube cut lenght wise.The barrel is 22" in diameter and about 34" long. Put it inside of the trash can liner and into the 55 gal drum. When it gets full first remove the sono tube and then the full trash can liner. Sounds good I shall see.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
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#26
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
I use a 40 gal trash can and am thinking of using some ply in the shape of a + running from the top to the bottom. It would be open in the centers of each arm to avoid impeding airflow. With mine, the weight of about 1/3 full is enough to keep the bag where it should be which would allow the plywood cross to be removed..
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#27
  Re: RE: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I think I will try a...)
(01-01-2022, 06:52 PM)lift mechanic Wrote: I think I will try a piece of 24" sono tube cut lenght wise.The barrel is 22" in diameter and about 34" long. Put it inside of the trash can liner and into the 55 gal drum. When it gets full first remove the sono tube and then the full trash can liner. Sounds good I shall see.

If that doesn't work for you, here's my solution. I use a piece of counter top laminate. It is thin and flexible enough to get the job done. Hopefully you can find a scrap somewhere so you don't need to buy it.
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#28
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
The formica type thing would work, I don't have any. I can only find sono tube in 10' @ too much. I will check prices for the formica in my area. Thanks for the idea.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
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#29
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
If by chance you happen to be past a Habitat restore, they sometimes have scraps of laminate for next to nothing. If you use it, I think I'd duct tape the edges in an effort to keep it from ripping the bag.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#30
  Re: How To secure dust catcher liner? by lift mechanic (I use a 55 gal drum ...)
Accidentally posted this in another DC thread...senior moment...

Found this potential solution in a 2018 issue of FWW magazine.  Made from a heavy rubber mat; can sometimes be found at farm supply stores.

   

The question that's not answered, though, is once you put something inside the bag to hold it down, how do you get it out without making a mess?  I have had limited luck in doing that.  

I have a bin with about 30 gallons capacity.  I don't use a liner for the bin in my DC.  When it's time to empty it, I remove the bin, slide an appropriate sized bag over the bin, and then slowly tip it over to keep the dust down, and gently remove the now-upside-down bin.  All while wearing a dust mask, of course.

I have a large-ish garden with raised beds, and I often use sawdust in the walkways between the raised beds.  If the sawdust is composed of clean, garden-compatible sawdust, I'll just put the bin on a dolly and wheel it to the garden and put the sawdust in the walkways.  Keeps the mud and weeds in the garden at bay.  I don't use it as mulch in the raised beds.
Ray
(formerly "WxMan")
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