Clamping mitered Legs
#11
I'm sure it's been discussed, but couldn't search on it

I'm making a cabinet out of 1 1/2 x  x 2 1/2 alder, and want the front legs to look like a solid 2 1/2 piece.  Cutting and splining them is easy enough... but looking for suggestions how to camp them for gluing.

Any suggestions?

thank you, Dave
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#12
Wrapping them with a spiral of stretchy cord will hold them tight, and allow you to see any little misalignment that might need to be adjusted.
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#13
if you're just glueing two pieces together to get a solid 2-1/2" leg, use a bit of table salt to keep them from slipping while you clamp. If you're mitering four pieces together, you can skip the splines and just miter-fold them. I don't know how to make a link, so copy and paste this to your browser for a quick tutorial. This is similar to how I do it except I use filament strapping tape around the box and I don't spread glue near my Uni-saw.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-H-4zGDv1Vs

Hey! The Woodnet software or a Moderator made it a link.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#14
Do as done in the video or, if you use splines, you can just use a bunch of regular clamps. The splines will keep them aligned.
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#15
I don't use splines.  It is face grain to face grain and will make a strong joint. 

I cut all the pieces and then use packing tape along the entire outer face of all the joints.  Then I turn it over and apply glue to all the surfaces to be joined and fold it up into a square.  I use tape to close the entire thing.  I check for squareness and clamp diagonally if required (but I have never had to do that). 

Wait for the glue to dry and then peel off the tape.  I use the heaviest gage clear packing tape I can find. 

If any of the corners are not completely closed run a shaft of a round-edge screwdriver up and down the length to roll the edges closed.  If your saw it set right, you won't have to do this. I don't think you can break the joints after the glue has dried.  I find that a spline is an unnecessary impediment to turning out these legs.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#16
(01-04-2022, 10:34 AM)Cooler Wrote: I don't use splines.  It is face grain to face grain and will make a strong joint. 

I cut all the pieces and then use packing tape along the entire outer face of all the joints.  Then I turn it over and apply glue to all the surfaces to be joined and fold it up into a square.  I use tape to close the entire thing.  I check for squareness and clamp diagonally if required (but I have never had to do that). 

Wait for the glue to dry and then peel off the tape.  I use the heaviest gage clear packing tape I can find. 

If any of the corners are not completely closed run a shaft of a round-edge screwdriver up and down the length to roll the edges closed.  If your saw it set right, you won't have to do this. I don't think you can break the joints after the glue has dried.  I find that a spline is an unnecessary impediment to turning out these legs.

Splines are a suitable alternative to the tape method explained in the video and what you describe. The splines in this case are not for strength, but for alignment as explained above. If someone wants to use clamps rather than tape, either splines or biscuits will work just fine. The splines or biscuits are no more an "unnecessary impediment" than wrapping the whole thing in tape. Either method works.
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#17
When I built some table legs that I wanted to look like solid legs and QSWO on all sides I used a 45 deg lock miter bit. The bit takes a little setting up but the results are worth it. Clamping is easy and squares up almost automatically.
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#18
(01-04-2022, 11:08 AM)Willyou Wrote: Splines are a suitable alternative to the tape method explained in the video and what you describe. The splines in this case are not for strength, but for alignment as explained above. If someone wants to use clamps rather than tape, either splines or biscuits will work just fine. The splines or biscuits are no more an "unnecessary impediment" than wrapping the whole thing in tape. Either method works.

When I used the word "impediment", I was really referring to a "consumer of time and effort".  The tape method is quick and easy and nearly foolproof from my experience.  The tape provides the alignment.

I should have chosen my words more carefully.

Regardless of the method, they all do share the same need for an accurate cut.  If I were to err on the cut angle I would much prefer to err on the side of being too acute.  At least then the appearance of the joint will be fine.  As long as the cut is not too far out of spec the joint should be sufficiently strong for this application.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#19
(01-01-2022, 04:28 PM)DaveBozeman Wrote: I'm sure it's been discussed, but couldn't search on it

I'm making a cabinet out of 1 1/2 x  x 2 1/2 alder, and want the front legs to look like a solid 2 1/2 piece.  Cutting and splining them is easy enough... but looking for suggestions how to camp them for gluing.

Any suggestions?

thank you, Dave

Ball bungees.  Stretch, wrap, secure ball through loop.

I used biscuits. not splines. Seemed easier.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#20
(01-04-2022, 03:10 PM)Cooler Wrote: When I used the word "impediment", I was really referring to a "consumer of time and effort".  The tape method is quick and easy and nearly foolproof from my experience.  The tape provides the alignment.

I should have chosen my words more carefully.

Regardless of the method, they all do share the same need for an accurate cut.  If I were to err on the cut angle I would much prefer to err on the side of being too acute.  At least then the appearance of the joint will be fine.  As long as the cut is not too far out of spec the joint should be sufficiently strong for this application.

Thanks for the clarification. My comment was only to emphasize that both methods work well. It just depends on your preferences and whether you have more clamps or more tape. Of course, the clamping method is very difficult without splines or biscuits  to keep the pieces aligned while clamping. BTW, it should be noted that some folks put a square "core" into the legs. Those help with clamping, but i find that they have to be very precisely cut or they will keep the miters from closing. So, if I need to fill the core, I will insert them after the miters are glued and dry. Even then, I only fill the core where needed along the length of the leg; perhaps where a mortise and tenon is needed.
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