Nailing back to a cabinet
#19
  Re: RE: Nailing back to a cabinet by jteneyck (I almost never nail ...)
(01-15-2022, 10:27 AM)jteneyck Wrote: I almost never nail things because it's more irreversible than using a screw.  But either would work for the back boards.  When I've done cabinet backs with boards I either use a T&G or splines to avoid visible gaps and leave 1/16" between the boards.  I've done this with white oak without an issue so you should be fine with walnut.  

John

First line is an excellent point, John! Plywood of your choice solves the problem. However, should you decide to use T&G boards, *****-lap, etc. it is far easier to attach with screws that are pre-drilled than nails IMO. And nothing like being prepared for that "Oops" moment we all seem to encounter sooner or later!

Doug
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#20
  Re: Nailing back to a cabinet by Halfathumb ([color=#000000][size...)
How is removing nails on a ply back a problem? By nails, we don't mean brads.

Tons of vintage pieces are restored by restoration tradespeople and nails are not harder to handle than broken/stripped rusty screws.

Simon
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#21
  Re: RE: Nailing back to a cabinet by Handplanesandmore (How is removing nail...)
(01-16-2022, 03:36 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: How is removing nails on a ply back a problem? By nails, we don't mean brads.

Tons of vintage pieces are restored by restoration tradespeople and nails are not harder to handle than broken/stripped rusty screws.

Simon

True enough, but I was referring to ME needing to remove the boards (or plywood) during the build process, for one reason or another, not someone else down the road.  I bought a stapler several years ago thinking it would make attaching plywood backs onto cabinets a breeze, and it is.  Just don't try to remove one, however.  Those things grip like it was glued on.  

John
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#22
  Re: RE: Nailing back to a cabinet by Handplanesandmore (How is removing nail...)
(01-16-2022, 03:36 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: How is removing nails on a ply back a problem? By nails, we don't mean brads.

Tons of vintage pieces are restored by restoration tradespeople and nails are not harder to handle than broken/stripped rusty screws.

Simon

In my past experience nails are more difficult to remove than screws. If screws are "broken, stripped or rusty" they most assuredly will be more difficult to extract also. Staples are a great fastener for backs on cabinets, IF you don't for some reason, have to remove them. I used them extensively when I built 15+ ft. of base cabinets for the shop a couple years ago. And most do have glue on them; actuated by heat when they are driven into the material. As John said, don't plan on extracting them easily - DAMHIKT.

Doug
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#23
  Re: Nailing back to a cabinet by Halfathumb ([color=#000000][size...)
To attach 1/4" thick plywood backs, I have used narrow crown stapler and glue.  The narrow crown holds better than the tiny head on the 18 gage nails.  I would not use that technique if the back were to be exposed.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#24
  Re: RE: Nailing back to a cabinet by Cooler (To attach 1/4" thick...)
(01-18-2022, 12:34 PM)Cooler Wrote: To attach 1/4" thick plywood backs, I have used narrow crown stapler and glue.  The narrow crown holds better than the tiny head on the 18 gage nails.  I would not use that technique if the back were to be exposed.

Where the back is to be exposed, I have glued a 1/4" plywood back into a snug fitting rabbet without the use of staples or nails. It can have a finished appearance this way.
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#25
  Re: RE: Nailing back to a cabinet by EdL (Made shiplap for the...)
(01-15-2022, 04:33 PM)EdL Wrote: Made shiplap for the back of my handtool cabi et, hard to see, but I cut a small 45° chamfer on the corners to dress it up.

Ed

Great look
Is this Cypress or Pine?
Gary

Please don’t quote the trolls.
Liberty, Freedom and Individual Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
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#26
  Re: Nailing back to a cabinet by Halfathumb ([color=#000000][size...)
tnx for sharing info
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