Aluminum Files
#11
Been thinking about getting a couple of basic files for the few times I need to file aluminum. Have been looking around the Net and not sure what I actually need. This would be for very occasional use when needing to clean up various aluminum jig parts etc. I was thinking a couple 8 inch in fine/extra fine would probably work.

Anyone have any suggestions, and maybe a good source to purchase from?
Thanks ,
Brian
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#12
(04-03-2022, 04:27 PM)BC in CT Wrote: Been thinking about getting a couple of basic files for the few times I need to file aluminum. Have been looking around the Net and not sure what I actually need.  This would be for very occasional use when needing to clean up various aluminum jig parts etc.  I was thinking a couple 8 inch in fine/extra fine would probably work.

Anyone have any suggestions, and maybe a good source to purchase from?
Thanks ,
Brian

Get some files that aircraft mechanics use, most good ones don’t clog, cut well. Come in various sizes, shapes, etc.
Used many of them during my aviation career.
....the measure of a man is not what he does when people are around, it is what he does when no one is around.....

USAF, 1976-1982
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#13
Visit the McMaster-Carr website. They have a wide choice of files, from coarse to fine, and shapes also (flat, half-round, etc.). Make sure you choose a file specifically made to file aluminum. And also Google how to clean the file.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#14
Just noting that cheap files are indeed cheap, so don't be seduced by low prices. Quality files cost. If you can find them NOS US made files can be very good, new production from, say Nicholson, will disappoint. I've heard very good things about these guys, but are in Italy, and shipping can be an issue.... https://www.corradishop.com/
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#15
Another way to go is Boggs Tool.

T
ell them what you want to do, and they will not only recommend the specific file(s) you want, but they will send you the sharpest files you ever used. For great prices. I don't know how they do it.
Best,
Aram, always learning

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: My woodworking photo site
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#16
(04-03-2022, 04:27 PM)BC in CT Wrote: Been thinking about getting a couple of basic files for the few times I need to file aluminum. Have been looking around the Net and not sure what I actually need.  This would be for very occasional use when needing to clean up various aluminum jig parts etc.  I was thinking a couple 8 inch in fine/extra fine would probably work.

Anyone have any suggestions, and maybe a good source to purchase from?
Thanks ,
Brian

.....................
Brian, I may still have some of these...the top file with curved teeth is the type with tang that I may still have..I think they are 12" and they are new..I have forgotten the brand and IIRC they are 8tooth..

https://www.icscuttingtools.com/catalog/page_353.pdf..
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
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#17
And make sure you get a good file card to clean them with.

Ed
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#18
and buy some chalk - sidewalk chalk might be good - and chalk the files before you start working.  The chalk acts as a release agent, so the aluminum swarf doesn't stick to the file as much as it otherwise can.
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#19
I thought the use of chalk was for when you used standard metal files on aluminum, didn't know it was necessary for aluminum specific files?

All good suggestions here, I think I'll start with Boggs first to see what they have, I hadn't thought of them but I do remember they have an excellent reputation.
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#20
(04-04-2022, 06:03 PM)BC in CT Wrote: I thought the use of chalk was for when you used standard metal files on aluminum, didn't know it was necessary for aluminum specific files?

All good suggestions here, I think I'll start with Boggs first to see what they have, I hadn't thought of them but I do remember they have an excellent reputation.
.......................
I's advised for all files.,,Softer metals can get "pinned" in the space {grooves} between the teeth, just like steel will do, and can be hard to remove. The metal is said to be "pinned".....Chalking helps prevent pinning or loading...Most old machinists kept a small piece of brass in their toolbox and would use it to "follow the serrations" and push the trapped metal out..Lots of old file cards included a small piece of sharpened steel like a scriber, and they used it to follow the "grooves" in order to push out trapped "pins" that the card can't remove.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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