Paul Sellers sharpening system, which diamond stones?
Rob ( Sancho) Cosman will tell you....
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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(06-21-2022, 11:25 AM)bandit571 Wrote: Rob ( Sancho) Cosman will tell you....

...........

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Yes
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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(06-10-2022, 05:31 AM)Ricky Wrote: Okay, update. Ive been playing with the Seller method and now getting fairly consistent results.   Because its fairly quick Ive added another step or two.  After the 3 diamond plates I'm also giving the irons a few swipes on the round 3K (thanks Jack!).
I couldn't find my strop so instead spending another 30 seconds or so on my shapton 12K ceramic.  That includes doing the Dave Charlesworth (RIP)
ruler trick.  Produces a very sharp edge, tested on newspaper, forearm hair and flattening a bench top with these 3 planes. (using winding sticks,
another learning curve involved.)
Laugh
They all have thick irons which I assume is making the learning curve easier.   The type 13 number 5 jack has a hock iron/chipbreaker.
So far I'm liking it.   I'm trying to getting away from waterstones, but this ceramic very hard, takes a while to go out of flat and just a spritz of
water.


[Image: 52135784761_7f48472f10.jpg]

Here's a guy cutting some fairly intricate joints with what looks like a "convex" (rounded under) bevel a la Paul Sellers, et al. Like most things, it ends up being the Indian and not the arrow. Impulse hardened Japanese saw too -- $40 unit I guess. If that. Don't know about the chisel.
Teknik Pengerjaan Kayu Jepang Keterampilan Tangan Tukang Kayu Sambung Kayu Elegan - YouTube
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I used to have an instruction sheet from ECE Emmerich (German premium wood plane maker).    They use fairly thick blades, and they had stated that a concave grind on the bevel wasn't preferred.

I may not actually be speaking to the topic of the thread.... sorry!
Chris
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(06-22-2022, 07:09 AM)C. in Indy Wrote: I used to have an instruction sheet from ECE Emmerich (German premium wood plane maker).    They use fairly thick blades, and they had stated that a concave grind on the bevel wasn't preferred.

I may not actually be speaking to the topic of the thread.... sorry!

It's on point particularly when talking about Sellers since the method informs the media.  His method is tough on oilstones as it's hard to do the procedure anywhere else other than the middle of the stone -- it's hard to work the margins, at least IMO it is.
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(06-22-2022, 07:52 AM)CStan Wrote: It's on point particularly when talking about Sellers since the method informs the media.  His method is tough on oilstones as it's hard to do the procedure anywhere else other than the middle of the stone -- it's hard to work the margins, at least IMO it is.

..........
Here is part three of a video that shows how Bill Carter makes an oilstone box that allows one to utilize more of the hone's length, rather than just the center of it...I have seen boxes that were made like this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UAdQ03seSE
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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(06-22-2022, 10:32 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: ..........
Here is part three of a video that shows how Bill Carter makes an oilstone box that allows one to utilize more of the hone's length, rather than just the center of it...I have seen boxes that were made like this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UAdQ03seSE

I have run-off blocks on my stones.  Still not great with the Seller's bit.  Something about it.  If I was going to use that method on every chisel I had, I'd get diamond stones.
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(06-22-2022, 06:32 AM)CStan Wrote: Here's a guy cutting some fairly intricate joints with what looks like a "convex" (rounded under) bevel a la Paul Sellers, et al.  Like most things, it ends up being the Indian and not the arrow.  Impulse hardened Japanese saw too -- $40 unit I guess.  If that.  Don't know about the chisel.
Teknik Pengerjaan Kayu Jepang Keterampilan Tangan Tukang Kayu Sambung Kayu Elegan - YouTube

The part of the chisel doing the cutting looks pretty flat to me.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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(06-22-2022, 07:09 AM)C. in Indy Wrote: I used to have an instruction sheet from ECE Emmerich (German premium wood plane maker).    They use fairly thick blades, and they had stated that a concave grind on the bevel wasn't preferred.

I may not actually be speaking to the topic of the thread.... sorry!

You're right on target since this style of sharpening does produce a convex grind.   I'm getting the edge very sharp,  including my ECE  Primus smoother.  Not noticing any disadvantage to doing it this way on that style of plane.  Probably just the maker's preferred way of sharpening.
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A little surprised by that Japanese woodworker. Sawing looked pretty sloppy. I think he didn’t attack the line like I would have, which resulted in a lot of paring, some of which also didn’t look that good. If you watch closely you can see that chisel submarining. He undercut a couple sharpie marks. This is why I tell people not to rely on bevel up paring.

Totally agree with your (collective) points tho. The chisel looks flat or convex and the wood obviously doesn’t care. Doesn’t look ridiculously sharp tho, but totally acceptable.
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