Paul Sellers sharpening system, which diamond stones?
#21
(04-24-2022, 08:05 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: I find it revealing that Paul Sellers uses 300/600/1000 grit diamond stones. This suggests that his sharpening method is inefficient. By contrast, many (myself included) begin their sharpening sequence from 1000 grit. Paul does not end with 1000 grit, and neither does anyone else, but this is not relevant here.

The reason he begins with 300 grit is because he has to remove more steel. The long, curved bevel face has far more steel to remove than honing a micro bevel (in the case of freehanding on the face if a hollow grind). or honing a secondary micro bevel (in the case of a honing guide). In the method I prefer - honing on a hollow - the amount of steel to remove is minuscule, and it is possible to even forgo the 1000 grit.

Regards from Perth

Derek
I guess I’m not up on how Paul sharpens, but I don’t hollow grind, don’t use jigs. I sharpen frequently and believe if you start with a polished edge, it holds up better.

I like my 1000 grit diasharp. I don’t know how one can stop there tho.
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#22
(04-24-2022, 09:10 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: I guess I’m not up on how Paul sharpens, but I don’t hollow grind, don’t use jigs. I sharpen frequently and believe if you start with a polished edge, it holds up better.

I like my 1000 grit diasharp. I don’t know how one can stop there tho.


He goes up to 1200 diamond then 30 strokes on the strop.  Does the same on chisels and plane blades. 


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#23
(04-25-2022, 12:07 PM)Ricky Wrote: He goes up to 1200 diamond then 30 strokes on the strop.  Does the same on chisels and plane blades. 


..............
I noticed that he doesn't bother to wipe the swarf off the tool as he finishes on the coarse and goes to the "fine" hone and then, still not wiping, he goes to the super fine with the coarser swarf {start about 30 on the video}....I guess he has a different concept than I do of what "sharp" really is. But IMO, he is not alone in that....OTOH, just "how" sharp does a tool have to be? If I am using the "Armstrong" method of work, I want the tool to be as sharp as I can get it." If I am using electrons, I want the tool to be sharp enough to produce work that I am satisfied with.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
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#24
As to brand, take a look at Atoma.  You can find them on Amazon at good prices.  They cut very well and really last.  I have DMT stones too and the Atoma are head and shoulders better.  Do read carefully as some are just the thin replaceable plate, not the full diamond plate and base plate.  I use a 12K man made stone from Japan and strop after using one or more diamond stones.
It's all wood.
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#25
(04-25-2022, 12:50 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ..............
I noticed that he doesn't bother to wipe the swarf off the tool as he finishes on the coarse and goes to the "fine" hone and then, still not wiping, he goes to the super fine with the coarser swarf {start about 30 on the video}....I guess he has a different concept than I do of what "sharp" really is. But IMO, he is not alone in that....OTOH, just "how" sharp does a tool have to be? If I am using the "Armstrong" method of work, I want the tool to be as sharp as I can get it." If I am using electrons, I want the tool to be sharp enough to produce work that I am satisfied with.
No matter how he does it, Seller does some good work and is one of the more helpful to others in trying to educate them. No person or habits are shared by all of us, so there is always going to be a difference in how we work. In his case what works for him must work as he gets a lot of projects done and most all I've seen look fine and I wouldn't be ashamed of any of the ones I've seen the Seller's has done.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#26
(04-25-2022, 04:04 PM)TraditionalToolworks Wrote: No matter how he does it, Seller does some good work and is one of the more helpful to others in trying to educate them. No person or habits are shared by all of us, so there is always going to be a difference in how we work. In his case what works for him must work as he gets a lot of projects done and most all I've seen look fine and I wouldn't be ashamed of any of the ones I've seen the Seller's has done.

.........
To each his own..if he's satisfied with what he's doing, that's fine with me.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#27
(04-25-2022, 01:42 PM)ChuckHill Wrote: As to brand, take a look at Atoma.  You can find them on Amazon at good prices.  They cut very well and really last.  I have DMT stones too and the Atoma are head and shoulders better.  Do read carefully as some are just the thin replaceable plate, not the full diamond plate and base plate.  I use a 12K man made stone from Japan and strop after using one or more diamond stones.

Like to hear more, Chuck. Are there any comparisons? I’ve heard people say the DMT diasharps are not flat enough.

The Atoma appear to be 10” X 4”. I don’t love wide stones. Like to hear others opinions.
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#28
(04-25-2022, 12:50 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ..............
I noticed that he doesn't bother to wipe the swarf off the tool as he finishes on the coarse and goes to the "fine" hone and then, still not wiping, he goes to the super fine with the coarser swarf {start about 30 on the video}

I was thinking the same thing.  My guess is that those diamond plates, once broken in don't release much of their grit like water stones do, but that's just a guess.
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#29
(04-25-2022, 12:50 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ..............
.I guess he has a different concept than I do of what "sharp" really is. But IMO, he is not alone in that....OTOH, just "how" sharp does a tool have to be?

He does have interesting view on sharpness. This is a good video explaining his philosophy of sharpness.  He says when using too high a grit
on certain projects he has to "roughen" the surface with sandpaper to get it to properly take the finishes he uses on them.  In other words
finer/sharper not always better in practicality.  

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#30
(04-25-2022, 07:36 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: To each his own..if he's satisfied with what he's doing, that's fine with me.
Jack,

Just trying to cut the guy some slack, it's easy to put people under the Internet microscope, IMO.

I haven't really watched any of his stuff recently, I just follow a few guys on IG. Certainly not suggesting anyone follows any of Seller's advice, but he's a pretty credible guy. I don't see his way, but it seems to work for him. As an example, he used a lot of particle or LVM on his bench, as I recall. Not my style of bench, but it seemed to work for him. Lots of great craftsmen out there, some really cool Japanese craftsmen as well as European, etc...Some people have more, some people have less in the way of tools.

Certainly not supporting Seller's sharpening habits, but would still think about using diamond plates, would just look for a set with a finer grit than 1000. Honestly, my water stones are gonna get my tools sharp, I just need to soak 'em for a bit and they'll be good to go. Not meaning to offend anyone.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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