Paul Sellers sharpening system, which diamond stones?
#41
(04-26-2022, 09:06 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: ..........


Now...go to Amazon and buy one of these round 6" 3,000 grit diamond laps for about 12 bucks and see what I'm talking about !! Use it like a rectangular diamond plate...it doesn't have to rotate to work.. Diamonds are plated onto a ~90thou.flat steel plate in pretty heavy concentration and I think you will be both surprised and pleased at how well they do their job.... You don't have to spend a hundred bucks to sharpen with diamonds. You will probably want to sell your Jap water stones, Belgian Coticules and Escher's after using it!!!

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I just bought one of the 10 dollar ones on Amazon  (6" 3K lapping disc).  Thanks for the heads up.
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#42
(04-26-2022, 01:52 PM)Ricky Wrote: Yeah, I'v geeked out on knife sharpening videos in the past.  Hair whittling and slicing through paper towels  a good test of atom splitting sharpness. 

Yes
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Have you noticed when they test sharpness by splitting a hair, the direction the blade goes is always root to tip?... That is because hairs have microscopic scales called cuticle that are attached to a central "stalk"..and they grow overlapping, also like a fish..it is many times easier to slice so that the blade goes UNDER those scales than on top of them to get to that stalk

..Blades cut quicker and cleaner when they are pulled or pushed back {slicing action" and forth on the material to be cut, because even a micro polished edge has serrations and those serrations act like a saw. A highly polished edge can cut down to the molecular level of wood, separating or splitting the molecules..Unfortunately, an edge that fine doesn't usually stay that sharp for long without folding over, chipping and otherwise dulling. The internet is a wonderful source of knowledge if you can filter out all the B/S.
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#43
(04-26-2022, 02:26 PM)Ricky Wrote: I just bought one of the 10 dollar ones on Amazon  (6" 3K lapping disc).  Thanks for the heads up.
.............
Good for you Ricky!! I advise you to use a thin lubricant like WD40, glass cleaner etc..They can be used dry but like any porus hone, they can load up which reduces cutting action.Lube helps float it so you can wipe it off occasionally..As it is used, the cutting action will be reduced and it will present a more polished result. This will continue until it is worn out, and that takes quite a while, considering that the diamonds are plated on rather than being sintered. Just use light pressure..and let the diamonds do their magic.
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"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
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#44
(04-26-2022, 01:47 PM)Ricky Wrote: Nah, you needn't be bothered.  Paul has plenty of videos showing his use of scrub planes, jointer planes, dado planes, plough planes, router planes (he even shows how to build one), molding planes etc.  He only used # 4 here for an example.   He seems reluctant in most of his videos to use electrons, mostly focuses on hand tools.


In this video he did say there are times when higher grits are helpful.   He even mentioned that his son who builds violins has use 20K grit to
plane the inside of violins he builds.  The surface effects the sound quality.

Paul Sellers puts on an act as if he knows how to prepare stock by hand, but when I watch him it is obvious that he is a beginner, going through the motions. If he hasn't noticed that sharper, more polished edges are easier to use and stay sharp longer (well worth the extra seconds), he is either not very experienced or not very discerning.
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#45
I agree with you (I realize his skill level is above mine, but that doesn't mean he's above reproach).

I thought it was almost common knowledge that a sharper edge lasted longer.
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#46
(04-26-2022, 05:52 PM)only 3 injuries Wrote: I agree with you (I realize his skill level is above mine, but that doesn't mean he's above reproach).

I thought it was almost common knowledge that a sharper edge lasted longer.

Actually, the definition of "a sharper edge" comes into play.

A plane blade with a 10* bevel might be "sharper" than one with a 25" bevel, but the edge of the blade with the 10* bevel will roll over almost immediately.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#47
(04-25-2022, 08:03 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: Like to hear more, Chuck. Are there any comparisons? I’ve heard people say the DMT diasharps are not flat enough.

The Atoma appear to be 10” X 4”. I don’t love wide stones. Like to hear others opinions.

Could you say some more about this, please?

I knew that I should have a preference for stones/plates that are wider than my blades, but I had not come across a reason to not want wide stones/plates.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#48
(04-26-2022, 06:38 PM)iclark Wrote: Actually, the definition of "a sharper edge" comes into play.

A plane blade with a 10* bevel might be "sharper" than one with a 25" bevel, but the edge of the blade with the 10* bevel will roll over almost immediately.
................
A plane blade with a 10* bevel might be "sharper" than one with a 25" bevel, but the edge of the blade with the 10* bevel will roll over almost immediately.

That "should" be true depending on how both are used and if both are made of the same kind of steel, hardened and tempered to the same Rc.  It may also matter whether or not the ten* bevel is skewed. A "skewed" blade is a sharper {and stronger} blade... That old saying.."you don't skin a bear with a straight razor" is true.
Big Grin

Ron Hock:
When a plane blade is pushed straight ahead into the wood, the shaving follows the pitch of the blade. When you skew the plane, the shaving follows the longer, but shallower diagonal path up the blade. This fact can come in handy if you are planing, for example, end grain and need to shear the fibers at a lower angle of attack to get the best finish. This lower angle of attack comes with the same bevel and relief angles on the blade. If you honed a low-angle plane to match the skewed angle you may need to grind the blade to a thin, fragile edge.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
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#49
(04-26-2022, 02:28 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ...............
Have you noticed when they test sharpness by splitting a hair, the direction the blade goes is always root to tip?... That is because hairs have microscopic scales called cuticle that are attached to a central "stalk"..and they grow overlapping, also like a fish..it is many times easier to slice so that the blade goes UNDER those scales than on top of them to get to that stal

I have noticed that and remember reading that fact (about the scales) in one of the comments in a video.  
Yes
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#50
(04-26-2022, 03:33 PM)wmickley Wrote: Paul Sellers puts on an act as if he knows how to prepare stock by hand, but when I watch him it is obvious that he is a beginner, going through the motions. If he hasn't noticed that sharper, more polished edges are easier to use and stay sharp longer (well worth the extra seconds), he is either not very experienced or not very discerning.

 
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