Paul Sellers sharpening system, which diamond stones?
#51
(04-26-2022, 03:33 PM)wmickley Wrote: Paul Sellers puts on an act as if he knows how to prepare stock by hand, but when I watch him it is obvious that he is a beginner, going through the motions. If he hasn't noticed that sharper, more polished edges are easier to use and stay sharp longer (well worth the extra seconds), he is either not very experienced or not very discerning.

Agree he is a bit of a poseur, as they say in France; he shows some real sparks in overall talent, but his job is to create 'buzz" online, and to do that he has a **lot** of what I call brain f-a-r-t-s, making silly recommendations, and trying to be overly creative to juice his online presence.  I don't really agree with many of his sharpening ideas, especially about handsaws, which are frankly a disgrace.
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#52
(04-26-2022, 02:38 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .............
Good for you Ricky!! I advise you to use a thin lubricant like WD40, glass cleaner etc..They can be used dry but like any porus hone, they can load up which reduces cutting action.Lube helps float it so you can wipe it off occasionally..As it is used, the cutting action will be reduced and it will present a more polished result. This will continue until it is worn out, and that takes quite a while, considering that the diamonds are plated on rather than being sintered. Just use light pressure..and let the diamonds do their magic.
Big Grin

Thanks Jack!  Hey, if you don't mind me asking, what's your favorite method of sharpening plane blades.  How high do you go in grit?
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#53
(04-26-2022, 09:06 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: You will probably want to sell your Jap water stones, Belgian Coticules and Escher's after using it!!!

Winkgrin
Winkgrin
Big Grin
Big Grin
Yeah, that was already my feeling, but I don't have a better way yet and that is what I have to sharpen, other than the Lap Sharp, Scary Sharp, or India stones.

That round diamond sound like a good one to use with a drawknife or adz. I like to secure the blade and use the stone to sharpen from above.

There is some irony on the Internet, I see people claiming how little Seller's knows, and I'm certainly not defending him, but he's doing his still and getting it done, opposed to being perfect and the world's best critic on the Internet. When I do that they belittle me, go figure...
Rolleyes It doesn't take long ti figure out who the blowhards are on the forum at any given time. A couple have proven that here on Woodnet.

Let's all go build something, even if you make a mistake, just do it and get something built. If you enjoy sharpening, now would be a good time to just spend some time with some tunes playing in the background and get some edge tools sharp.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#54
I like Paul Sellers. I find him watchable and thought provoking. I think the concept that there’s a limit to how sharp is sharp enough, is a good one. I don’t think 250 is the right grit, but Paul wasn’t really suggesting that. He was only making a point. I get it.

Personally, I wouldn’t use a plane that wasn’t pretty darned sharp. But I agree there are probably some who should put the micron diamond paste back in the drawer and build more stuff.
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#55
(04-26-2022, 08:54 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: I like Paul Sellers. I find him watchable and thought provoking. I think the concept that there’s a limit to how sharp is sharp enough, is a good one. I don’t think 250 is the right grit, but Paul wasn’t really suggesting that. He was only making a point. I get it.

Personally, I wouldn’t use a plane that wasn’t pretty darned sharp. But I agree there are probably some who should put the micron diamond paste back in the drawer and build more stuff.
Yes, I completely agree with you, and after I watched his video last night that was posted in this thread, that point couldn't have been clearer. However, there are people in this thread that prove not everyone got that point...they were too occupied criticizing why a specific grit was too course and too fine...that wasn't Seller's point, it was just that we don't need to get carried away with sharpening, and I am with you 100%, let's go build more stuff. Good or bad, just build it.

PS - I even think Jack appreciate other people's methods of sharpening, and yes, sharpening is one of those topics that hangs around woodworking and metalworking forums and will most likely forever...so wasn't being critical of anything Jack said...that 'ol coot is out sharpening his plane blades as I type! LOL
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#56
(04-26-2022, 06:43 PM)iclark Wrote: Could you say some more about this, please?

I knew that I should have a preference for stones/plates that are wider than my blades, but I had not come across a reason to not want wide stones/plates.

Maybe it doesn’t matter with diamonds. In general, I try to move my tools so that I wear the stone evenly. I think you can wear, clog, or remove diamonds from diasharp plates. If you rub a tool across a surface where there are more or less diamonds, you will quickly hone that tool out of flat. So for me, I like long narrow stones. I feel I can use the whole surface better.

Should have said - when I hone a tool’s back, I have the tool all the way across the stones width. Can’t really do that with a 4” wide stone. I think 3” is wide
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#57
(04-26-2022, 09:12 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: In general, I try to move my tools so that I wear the stone evenly.
This is good in general for all types of sharpening, whether it be on a flat stone, stone wheel, etc...This is why surface plates get worn in one spot and the top needs to be flattened,

(04-26-2022, 09:12 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: Should have said - when I hone a tool’s back, I have the tool all the way across the stones width. Can’t really do that with a 4” wide stone. I think 3” is wide
Jack made a comment about advising new woodworkers to learn to sharpen first. I couldn't agree more, that is the case for all hand tools. Until you can sharpen you should continue spending time until you do learn and then move on. This is also why people should learn to sharpen their saws before they move on. All edge tools require you know how to sharpen them, whether it's a spoke shave, chisel, plane blade, etc...

This is also true with flattening the back of a plane blade or chisel, as you're describing here. Until the back is perfectly done, one not think about moving to the bevel. I'm sure there are people that don't agree with that, after all, the ruler trick which I have used before I a kinda cheat so you don't need a perfectly flat back. It does take time to get a plane or chisel perfectly flat. Thanks for mentioning that with your reference to width!
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#58
(04-26-2022, 09:12 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: Maybe it doesn’t matter with diamonds. In general, I try to move my tools so that I wear the stone evenly. I think you can wear, clog, or remove diamonds from diasharp plates. If you rub a tool across a surface where there are more or less diamonds, you will quickly hone that tool out of flat. So for me, I like long narrow stones. I feel I can use the whole surface better.

Should have said - when I hone a tool’s back, I have the tool all the way across the stones width. Can’t really do that with a 4” wide stone. I think 3” is wide

Thank you. I think that I understand what you are saying.

Based on reports, the diamond plates do seem to have a break in period followed by a fairly long service life.

I look forward to someone coming out with inexpensive cubic boron nitride (CBN) plates. The shift to CBN wheels for sharpening turning tools has been an improvement.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#59
(04-26-2022, 08:02 PM)Ricky Wrote: Thanks Jack!  Hey, if you don't mind me asking, what's your favorite method of sharpening plane blades.  How high do you go in grit?
.............
Ricky, freehand, I can go from the 3k grit diamond right to the leather power strop..And I have several power strops, including the Tormek and Jet and several belt grinder/strops. If you charge a leather wheel with diamond paste or powder, you can put a dangerously sharp edge on in two minutes!!!! I'm not talking about the slow, wet machines...they work but too slowly to suit me..I use diamond on leather and chrome oxide on a tight muslin buff or a hard felt wheel...I will say that these machines have a learning curve to use them safely and correctly..Used incorrectly, they can hurt you BADLY..I can explain that but it's getting late here and I need to hit the sack. If you would like to know more about how I do it, let me know and I will post my method tomorrow.
Winkgrin

Here's one of the "half-speed" belt machines that I made and use frequently on my wood carving knives.........

[Image: 766-CFDF0-195-A-4800-B9-C8-0102-BBC8-B993-1-201-a.jpg]
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#60
(04-26-2022, 10:50 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .............
Ricky, freehand, I can go from the 3k grit diamond right to the leather power strop..And I have several power strops, including the Tormek and Jet and several belt grinder/strops. If you charge a leather wheel with diamond paste or powder, you can put a dangerously sharp edge on in two minutes!!!! I'm not talking about the slow, wet machines...they work but too slowly to suit me..I use diamond on leather and chrome oxide on a tight muslin buff or a hard felt wheel...I will say that these machines have a learning curve to use them safely and correctly..Used incorrectly, they can hurt you BADLY..I can explain that but it's getting late here and I need to hit the sack. If you would like to know more about how I do it, let me know and I will post my method tomorrow.
Winkgrin

Here's one of the "half-speed" belt machines that I made and use frequently on my wood carving knives.........

[Image: 766-CFDF0-195-A-4800-B9-C8-0102-BBC8-B993-1-201-a.jpg]

Sweet!  I've been using the same Norton waterstones for years.  Those along with a first generation veritas honing guide.The course side of one of the stones dished out in a couple weeks.
Laugh. The rest still going strong.  Combo stones 220/1k, 4k/8k. I usually take them upstairs to the kitchen sink to sharpen tools.  I enjoy using them to sharpen kitchen knives by hand but looking for a dryer routine for the basement tinkering area. Never used diamonds but liking the idea.  
Yes
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