pocket door install in new wall?
#11
When framing in a new, non load-bearing wall, is it particularly difficult/challenging to frame out and install a pocket door?
Any tips or recommendations for the pocket assembly?
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#12
(04-27-2022, 02:00 PM)mound Wrote: When framing in a new, non load-bearing wall, is it particularly difficult/challenging to frame out and install a pocket door?
Any tips or recommendations for the pocket assembly?

I've done a couple and it was pretty simple.  Just follow the manufacturers installation guidelines.  I'm not sure, but I think Johnson makes the best pocket door systems. 

John
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#13
(04-27-2022, 02:18 PM)jteneyck Wrote: I've done a couple and it was pretty simple.  Just follow the manufacturers installation guidelines.  I'm not sure, but I think Johnson makes the best pocket door systems. 

John

Yes, from my experience also.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#14
When hanging the drywall make sure the screws are not too long. Don’t ask….

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#15
Yes, Johnson makes some great pocket door systems and there are a few youtube videos that show exactly the installation process.
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#16
(04-27-2022, 07:02 PM)goaliedad Wrote: When hanging the drywall make sure the screws are not too long. Don’t ask….

It was a nail for the baseboard with me.  I couldn't figure out why the door wouldn't open - and then it dawned on me.  

John
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#17
(04-27-2022, 08:00 PM)jteneyck Wrote: It was a nail for the baseboard with me.  I couldn't figure out why the door wouldn't open - and then it dawned on me.  

John

Me too. Although I did learn to use 1" D.W. screws by then. Here's a few tips. Johnson offers pretty good kits and they're easy to assemble.. Some fully assembled ones are are not much easier, and the quality is sometimes questionable. Don't forget to install the bumper before drywall. My installations have evolved to installing a 1x4 "sub-jamb", shimmed perfectly plumb on the hand side before drywall (run it the full height of the R.O.). When trimming out the opening, the hand side jamb gets screwed to that "sub-jamb" and I also don't nail or staple the casing to it. This makes that jamb removable enabling removal of the door for painting or other maintenance; like trimming the bottom because the customer changed from sheet vinyl to ceramic one day before "turn-key". But, I digress. I tried mounting the track pitched to the hand side so it would be self closing. It didn't work but i mounted a spring on the bumper and wound up with something better. The door would stay open but if you bumped it open further, compressing the spring, it had the momentum to gently close. This was much better for the pantry (catch-all/hide it in there) room because it would close with a gentle nudge of the foot. I've also found that the locksets that install in a standard 2-1/8" bore door prep work better and are much easier to install and operate than the ones requiring a notch cut in the edge of the door.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#18
If it's going into a 2x4 framed wall, do you end up with a flexy wall because now you've got to use 1x material to support the drywall?
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#19
(04-28-2022, 02:29 PM)atgcpaul Wrote: If it's going into a 2x4 framed wall, do you end up with a flexy wall because now you've got to use 1x material to support the drywall?

The Johnson kits are pretty stout. I doubt you'll notice a difference. Just make sure everything is dead plum and square.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#20
(04-28-2022, 02:29 PM)atgcpaul Wrote: If it's going into a 2x4 framed wall, do you end up with a flexy wall because now you've got to use 1x material to support the drywall?

The thin "studs" are basically 1x3's wrapped in steel. The pair near the door opening typically gets a 1x2 jamb and casing attached; not super ridgid, but I wouldn't call it flimsy. If your time is worth anything, spending $ for a kit is more economical than piecing together the frame and buying just the track and trolleys. Exception: Extraordinarily large and/or heavy doors need appropriately heavy duty track and trolleys. The wall needs to be thicker than 3-1/2"  too. I stitch a steel stud in a track for each stud and a track ripped in half for the plate and shoe. (2x4's on the flat won't stay flat enough for a door frame.) Then I rip strips of 1/2" plywood scraps to 1-1/2" to build out both sides of the remaining wall framing. Now you can understand why I think the kit is well worth the money.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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