Acme Handsaw Filer Model HSF
#28
(05-10-2022, 12:08 PM)Pedder Wrote: thanks for the offer about the Disston 3 D, but that isn't what I want.
No wories, It's inside and away from the weather, so really it's not bothering anything any more than my old saws are...LOL

I knew it wasn't what you wanted, but I was looking at it as a consolation prize! LOL I like the 2 I have, I can even do full size handsaws with them.

Instead though, you're getting nothing and I get the Acme vise...It's all about being willing to part with the cash and being at the right spot at the right time. I'm a bit worried about buying more old tools or router bits, blades and other tooling he was selling. I hope most of it is gone. Luckily Doug has been liquidating since Jan. and he said most of it is in storage...Bad news is he still has stuff I'll probably buy...<blush>

I don't know if I'll use the filer or not, I like the look of the vise with the stand, but it might be more practical to leave the stand in the shop and only the vise at my woodworking bench.
Cool

Even local folks will balk at $800 and having to drag a 400 lb. filer home...I look at 400 lbs as being a light load...I can do that in my 24 year old Tacoma! LOL
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#29
There’s one for sale now on a saw collectors page on Facebook. Not mine. Near Detroit, MI. If you can’t find the post, let me know and I can send some more details.
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#30
(05-11-2022, 09:42 AM)ajkoontz Wrote: There’s one for sale now on a saw collectors page on Facebook. Not mine. Near Detroit, MI. If you can’t find the post, let me know and I can send some more details.
One good thing is I don't see it, so someone must have got it. Another good thing is that it was in Detroit, MI. Those are 2 discouraging factors for it, not to mention I really don't even need another one...(see my problem?)

There is an Acme circular saw sharpener for $1000, maybe that's the guy that had the filer/vise. If you could find a good deal on just the vise, that would be a better option. I will say that the Acme looks like a much better filer than the Foley "Rube Goldberg" Saw Filers. Doug says it could change my mind on saw filers, time will tell.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#31
Doug,

If you stop back in here, I'd like to thank you for a pleasant transaction, the filer is now home kinda safely.

Getting loaded...
   

NOS saw files, saw sets, 2 nice jointers...I think there were about 50 files in Slims and Extra Slims. The files I did buy, but Doug gave me a great deal! Thanks! One of the sets is big, like for a bow saw, big honkin' anvil. Antoher one for smaller teeth that is different from what I have used/seen. I use mostly Disston 42 and the likes, a couple I filed the anvils smaller to do small teeth, and I use the newer Grammercy ones in blue and gold, the smaller one has a small anvil.
   

Then Doug tipped to a great 'que joint, the owner had started in Oakland, CA before moving up by Concord and she even had Aaron Franklin and Rodney Scott to do a smoking demonstration of such...ribs could have been cooked a tad longer, too chewy and hard to pull off the bone...after I was asking about the brisket when the Franklin and Scott info came out as I was leaving...but she offers point or flat and doesn't serve on too big of a bun, that's important for me. Next time driving up there, I have to try a brisket sandwich with the point, of course. Owner also likes the point, gal working for her likes the flat...go figure...I'm a point kinda guy.
   

Coming back I drove slow, while it was only about 400 lbs. it doesn't take much to make my old Tacoma sag on the rear end. About half way home I get stuck in bumper to bumper traffic, and it turns out if was a serious accident and someone was having a bad hair day for sure...there was Fire trucks, EMTs, jaws of life on the scene...
   

Got back home and it's still sitting outside, I'll figure out getting it in tomorrow/today. As they say, possession is 9/10ths of the law!
   

The operation on this files is very interesting. The arm to the right side moves up and down to move the file up and down and the handwheel on the left move the file along the teeth. Doug also skips teeth and files every other one. But unlike the foley you can flip the angle and match up the tooth to get the correct angle, correct fleam and it will even adjust the up/down of the file, which Doug said he has never used but that it is used for chainsaw type cutters. No ratchets needed like the Foley, but Doug cautioned about small teeth with a new file and he said it's easy to mess the teeth up it cuts them so aggressively with a new file.

Believe it or not, someone bought the Acme company in San Jose and are still in business sharpening to this day, although Doug didn't recommend them and said a better place exists in Gilroy.

All in all it was a beautiful day, 84 degrees, sun felt good driving...gotta keep that Vitamin D up for COVID, doncha know?
Rolleyes

As the saying goes, "They can pry this Acme from my cold dead hands!"
Winkgrin
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#32
I love the old chevy you have behind your white truck.  Boy o Boy would that be something to drive. 
Yes
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#33
(05-15-2022, 06:22 AM)TraditionalToolworks Wrote: Doug,

If you stop back in here, I'd like to thank you for a pleasant transaction, the filer is now home kinda safely.

Getting loaded...


NOS saw files, saw sets, 2 nice jointers...I think there were about 50 files in Slims and Extra Slims. The files I did buy, but Doug gave me a great deal! Thanks! One of the sets is big, like for a bow saw, big honkin' anvil. Antoher one for smaller teeth that is different from what I have used/seen. I use mostly Disston 42 and the likes, a couple I filed the anvils smaller to do small teeth, and I use the newer Grammercy ones in blue and gold, the smaller one has a small anvil.


Then Doug tipped to a great 'que joint, the owner had started in Oakland, CA before moving up by Concord and she even had Aaron Franklin and Rodney Scott to do a smoking demonstration of such...ribs could have been cooked a tad longer, too chewy and hard to pull off the bone...after I was asking about the brisket when the Franklin and Scott info came out as I was leaving...but she offers point or flat and doesn't serve on too big of a bun, that's important for me. Next time driving up there, I have to try a brisket sandwich with the point, of course. Owner also likes the point, gal working for her likes the flat...go figure...I'm a point kinda guy.


Coming back I drove slow, while it was only about 400 lbs. it doesn't take much to make my old Tacoma sag on the rear end. About half way home I get stuck in bumper to bumper traffic, and it turns out if was a serious accident and someone was having a bad hair day for sure...there was Fire trucks, EMTs, jaws of life on the scene...


Got back home and it's still sitting outside, I'll figure out getting it in tomorrow/today. As they say, possession is 9/10ths of the law!


The operation on this files is very interesting. The arm to the right side moves up and down to move the file up and down and the handwheel on the left move the file along the teeth. Doug also skips teeth and files every other one. But unlike the foley you can flip the angle and match up the tooth to get the correct angle, correct fleam and it will even adjust the up/down of the file, which Doug said he has never used but that it is used for chainsaw type cutters. No ratchets needed like the Foley, but Doug cautioned about small teeth with a new file and he said it's easy to mess the teeth up it cuts them so aggressively with a new file.

Believe it or not, someone bought the Acme company in San Jose and are still in business sharpening to this day, although Doug didn't recommend them and said a better place exists in Gilroy.

All in all it was a beautiful day, 84 degrees, sun felt good driving...gotta keep that Vitamin D up for COVID, doncha know?
Rolleyes

As the saying goes, "They can pry this Acme from my cold dead hands!"
Winkgrin
..............
It looks like that old machine lamp on the filer would bring about a hundred bucks on Ebay..I still have a few and have sold a few. If you get a chance, how about posting a close-up photo of it...Just curious...
Winkgrin
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#34
(05-16-2022, 06:38 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: I love the old chevy you have behind your white truck.  Boy o Boy would that be something to drive. 
Yes
I love it too! In fact, it's my dream truck, I picked this era specific for the art decco features...(grill, lights, style, etc..)

Like old tools, I like old trucks also. I'm in the middle of a drivetrain conversion, adding an 5 speed overdrive transmission, an updated rear axle and replacing the ring/pinion so it will be able to drive comfortably. It runs good, but stuff like the brakes need attention (I did the front). Not looking for a hot rod, but just a functional driver. I will use it to pickup tools and machines like I do the Tacoma today, both are 1/2 ton, but honestly the Chevy is more capable of carrying 1000 lbs, it's just stronger and more sturdy. And this is the last era prior to GM starting to enlarge and make the trucks much more capable, quieter, etc...but it's the Art Deco era that is the last in breed to have side opening engine hoods on both side, crank out windshield, art deco styling....currently if you drive it when you get to about 45 mph it sounds like the engine is going to explode...and the trans sounds like it's about as happy...the old original drivetrains were just not up to even 55-60 mph on our highways. I like to go about 65-70 and it will do that after I get done.

Hard to see but it was painted with Rustoleum and a brush by the previous owner. There were only 2 owners before me, it lived in North Carolina most of it's life, original sold in '46 to a farmer post-war.

Thanks for the compliments, I do love the truck, and hope to drive it in my retirement...I'm looking for a simpler life...

I only hope I can still buy gasoline for it when I'm retired...I'll store gas and only drive the pickup occasionally if so...I hope I'm not still acquiring old tools at that point, but unfortunately I don't see that ending anytime soon...
Rolleyes

I replied to your other PM.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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