How Do I Cut This Tread?
#11
I have about six of these to cut back to where it was notched out for the old balusters. My plan is to make some returns and use a domino to join them to the end, but I have to get a good straight cut with the treads already in place. I think a circular saw or track saw would only get about half, but leave a really good cut. Maybe a jig saw? What about those circular saws with a small blade?

My newel posts finally arrived, so I'll be firing this project soon.

   
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#12
Ok, have to ask. Is it not possible to remove the treads, say one at a time? My only thought is to use a multi-tool, possibly.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#13
If the only option is to cut them in place, I'd use a handsaw.  

John
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#14
Have you got a dovetail saw to cut the sides and a coping saw to cut the bottom. A good sharp chisel to clean up the bottom.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


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#15
My first thought, before even which tool to use, was that a guide is necessary for accurate cuts and to protect the tread from overcuts (or oops). The guide I envision is basically another tread prepped for a tread return, (i.e. 1-1/2" 45* nosing return). It might be useful if it was wider so the 45* cut at the front would be longer. As to what tool to make the cut; my mind jumped back and forth between hand saw, backsaw, and multi-tool. Then it dawned on me, that with an accurate template, I could make most of the cut with a top bearing flush bit in a palm router. I would finish up the last few inches where the router base hit the riser with a flush cut trim saw, fine crosscut hand saw, or the Sawzall with a metal cutting blade. Even if the the 45* cut was off by half a degree or more, at least they'd all be the same.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#16
I was going to skip the miter, but a template with it and a flush trim bit might be the way to go. I could get it halfway close with the jigsaw and finish it with the router. Getting the last little bit with a hand saw wouldn't be bad.

It wouldn't be hard to make a template out of a piece of MDF.

Thanks for the idea.
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#17
Templates are the only way to get repeatability. I bought a set of these ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076JC...UTF8&psc=1 ) a few years ago. They aren't terrible, got the job done with one. I use the mortising bit with a 1/2" thick template made for three larger hinges when I install new doors in existing jambs. A template makes it accurate enough to mortise and install three hinge leafs on the doors in my shop. The next day I remove existing doors, mortise the jambs and install the second leafs. The only tools I need on site is the palm router, a small vac, screwgun, and my pouch. Just don't forget the template in the shop again!
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#18
(05-07-2022, 05:59 PM)lincmercguy Wrote: I have about six of these to cut back to where it was notched out for the old balusters. My plan is to make some returns and use a domino to join them to the end, but I have to get a good straight cut with the treads already in place. I think a circular saw or track saw would only get about half, but leave a really good cut. Maybe a jig saw? What about those circular saws with a small blade?

My newel posts finally arrived, so I'll be firing this project soon.

It is normal practice to split fine pencil lines when hand sawing dovetails.  Faced with cutting a 4' diameter circular table top I thought if I can saw dovetails with a hand saw what should be so difficult about splitting a line with a saber saw.  Well, it is not provided an optimum blade is used.  A new, fairly coarse blade is optimum.  So is excellent lighting.  I have sawed several circular table tops uneventfully.  

With a bit of practice and confidence you can do your job with a saber saw, then finish the cut with a hand saw as needed (presuming you are cutting all the say back to the riser).   I would use a Japanese cross cut pull saw.  Go slow and careful.
Bill Tindall
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#19
Museumguy already asked, but why can you not just pull them up? This is the simplest solution. Normally, treads aren't nailed down particularly well.

If in place, and you are removing the existing posts, I think a nice sharp handsaw with a guide would be easiest. Slow, but reliable.
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#20
The previous owner thought liquid nails would be the best way to secure them. I'm not a fan of the way he did them, but if I take them out, I might as well tear it all out including the stringers and do it over. We don't know how long we'll be here, so I'm not going to take it to that level.
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