A new door
#6
I have to install a new door in a friends house. It's a rather old house. This is an exterior door. I am using a solid core wood door, 30" wide, and a bit heavy. Th placement and width of the door does not allow for a pre-hung door. It is slightly under 30". The door measures 1.361" thick. I am also replacing the jamb. My question is about the hinges. Should the hinges cover the complete thickness of the door? Should I leave just the veneer? A bit more? I plan to put on four, 3 1/2" hinges. Is four hinges overkill?

Thanks for any help

Greg
Sometimes it's better to keep your mouth shut, and have the world think you a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
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#7
(05-09-2022, 08:26 AM)Gregor1 Wrote: I have to install a new door in a friends house. It's a rather old house. This is an exterior door. I am using a solid core wood door, 30" wide, and a bit heavy. Th placement and width of the door does not allow for a pre-hung door. It is slightly under 30". The door measures 1.361" thick. I am also replacing the jamb. My question is about the hinges. Should the hinges cover the complete thickness of the door? Should I leave just the veneer? A bit more? I plan to put on four, 3 1/2" hinges. Is four hinges overkill?

Thanks for any help

Greg

What you are asking about is called hinge backset.  For 1-3/8 to 1-3/4" doors the typical backset is 5/16" to the door frame rabbett or stop, and 1/4" on the door.  

Link

FWIW, the standard exterior door thickness these days is 1-3/4", though all sorts of different thicknesses have been used over the years.  

John
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#8
(05-09-2022, 09:24 AM)jteneyck Wrote: What you are asking about is called hinge backset.  For 1-3/8 to 1-3/4" doors the typical backset is 5/16" to the door frame rabbett or stop, and 1/4" on the door.  

Link

FWIW, the standard exterior door thickness these days is 1-3/4", though all sorts of different thicknesses have been used over the years.  

John

Thanks. Without seeing that, I'd ave probably made them both the same.
Sometimes it's better to keep your mouth shut, and have the world think you a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
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#9
(05-09-2022, 11:28 AM)Gregor1 Wrote: Thanks. Without seeing that, I'd have probably made them both the same.

Of course.  If you plan to use something like Q Lon weather stripping the setback on the frame might need to be a little larger, around 3/8".  It's best to make a mockup with scrap to make sure everything is going to fit properly.  

Q Lon  weather stripping is really easy to install if you are making the frame or the frame is in pieces.  You just run a 1/8" saw kerf along the frame about 1/2" deep into the door stop.   The weather stripping presses into that dado.  It is easily removed for painting, when needed, and can be reused if still in good shape.  Best of all, it's very forgiving and seals really well.  

Good luck.  

John
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#10
I would look for a hinge routing template to help set the hinges in the new door.  I have a Ryobi one that works pretty well.  It came with the router bit and a drill bit that lets you drill holes for the screws centered in the hinges.  The only downside is the backset is not adjustable unless you ***** the jig.

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