Need help selecting a table saw
#10
So i am getting on my feet again after some medical issues and it is time to get a table saw. 
My problem is that I have a budget of about $250. I missed out on the chance to get a late 90's Unisaw for $100 
for which I would have to rebuild the motor. 

So I am stuck with a few options. 

A 10" Delta contractor saw for $250

[Image: 179388108_142977667796759_92077294314053...e=62A59FBE]




Various iterations of craftsman contractor saws, $200-$220[Image: 276984835_5057580054323174_4637195129884...e=6284B3A0]

Or a DeWalt contractor saw with stand for $200 
[Image: 01616_eDy6JR59hHOz_1320uM_600x450.jpg] 


So assume I had the skills to repair anything electrically wrong with any of them, Which of these might be the better value for someone starting off doing Cutting and serving boards and other, smaller projects. With some allowance for graduation for something the size of a computer desk?
Reply
#11
None of those look like good choices in terms of doing consistent cuts without a lot of constant tuning.

If your cutting and serving boards are not segmented, then I would suggest that you look into track saws or, at your price point, circular saws with guides.

If you are wanting to do segmented, end-grain cutting boards; then recommendations depend on how complex the patterns are.
Simple rectangular or square blocks can be done on a TS with a sled (but might need higher quality that what is in your pics) or with a miter saw or RAS (with a negative rake blade).

You also might want to consider a handsaw to cut to length and a miter box for segments/strips. You might be amazed how quickly a sharp handsaw can cut wood.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
Reply
#12
What part of the country or what state are you in?  Several of us might have one hoarded away
Rolleyes
"Truth is a highway leading to freedom"  --Kris Kristofferson

Wild Turkey
We may see the writing on the wall, but all we do is criticize the handwriting.
(joined 10/1999)
Reply
#13
(05-13-2022, 10:17 PM)Wild Turkey Wrote: What part of the country or what state are you in?  Several of us might have one hoarded away
Rolleyes

East Texas
Reply
#14
That pretty looking Delta you linked first is not a contractors saw. It has a universal motor slung under it. Not a bad startersaw for the money but I would avoid any of the newer Delta stuff due to lack of parts and general orneriness over a brand that forsaken their customers.
Proud maker of large quantities of sawdust......oh, and the occasional project!
Reply
#15
(05-14-2022, 07:41 AM)KyleD Wrote: That pretty looking Delta you linked first is not a contractors saw. It has a universal motor slung under it. Not a bad startersaw for the money but I would avoid any of the newer Delta stuff due to lack of parts and general orneriness over a brand that forsaken their customers.

Thanks, i was just using "contractor" saw as a short hand for something that isn't, or does not appear to be a full cabinet a full cabinet. My mistake.
Reply
#16
The first two are contractor saws as we know them, and the Dewalt a job site saw.

It depends on how serious you plan to do woodworking as a hobby. For the long haul, get a cabinet saw. If you need the best safety protection, only the sawstop can deliver it unless you go for the Felder PCS which is a sliding saw though.

If you plan to do rough or carpentry work, any job site saw will do.

Simon
Reply
#17
I should be clear on why I posted about the Delta saw you listed. It was not to to correct you but to inform you. The Delta you listed has a motor system under it that is similar to most job site saws. These tend to develop problems much faster than a real contractors saw with an induction motor. Plus the universal motors such as used on contractors saws are screamers. I had a delta saw similar to the one you listed back in the 90s and got rid of it after going through the drama of replacing the drive belt. I moved up to a Delta Unisaw. The first time I turned it on it came to life in such a quiet way it put a big smile on me. A smile that still happens once in a while when I fire it up and think of the loud obnoxious sound of the universal motor in the old saw.
Proud maker of large quantities of sawdust......oh, and the occasional project!
Reply
#18
Get a used contractor's saw - not a jobsite saw. Contractors saws generally have totally enclosed fan cooled induction motors, which are quieter and more reliable than the universal motors found in jobsite saws.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.