Cosman's AdjuSTAR - Improvement or Gimmick?
#11
I stumbled across this video and it's interesting, but I think he's exaggerating it's benefits.  I don't seem to have issue he claims with either my vintage Stanley, Lie Nielsen, or Veritas hand planes.  Would like to hear opinions from y'all.

Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#12
Mine seem to work pretty well without it, but I’ve had quite a while to get used to them. I never noticed difficulty in turning the knob, but turning it a small enough amount might have been easier to learn with that knob.

If you did reposition your frog frequently, this would be helpful, but again I’ve not wanted to do that.

A finer thread could be useful, and less backlash would be particularly helpful if you did use a finer thread. These things are possible with the alternative parts from Reed Plane: https://www.woodbywright.com/shop/kits
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#13
(05-23-2022, 02:41 PM)Alan S Wrote: Mine seem to work pretty well without it, but I’ve had quite a while to get used to them.  I never noticed difficulty in turning the knob, but turning it a small enough amount might have been easier to learn with that knob. 

If you did reposition your frog frequently, this would be helpful, but again I’ve not wanted to do that.

A finer thread could be useful, and less backlash would be particularly helpful if you did use a finer thread.  These things are possible with the alternative parts from Reed Plane: https://www.woodbywright.com/shop/kits
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The "star" just decreases the amount of force it requires to move the blade..The blade is clamped between the frog and the lever cap...A clever person could just add brass "pegs" to the existing wheel adjuster to increase the leverage..The level cap "tightness" would not have to be changed...But a clever person could make adjustment even easier by slipping a small piece of teflon plastic between the lever cap and the blade..but not between the blade and the frog..Best to keep some sort of lube on the frog to reduce the friction.

As far as gimmick or not, I have always thought the wheel should be even larger to increase the leverage. Now that I think of it, brass pegs could be added to the wheel's rim by drilling it or soldering or both. I am too old to do it but I am pretty sure someone here could accomplish it..Teflon can be purchased in many configurations, like sheet, round stock, bar stock.. etc..And instead of teflon, Delrin/nylon could be used, and may be even better..anything with sufficient density and lubricity would probably work...
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#14
Just my view, but I see it as a $40 solution in search of a problem.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#15
The fine-thread adjuster and yoke offered by Reed Planes is likely a better solution for roughly the same cost. It is designed as a retrofit for Stanley planes Type 10 and newer.


[Image: PXL_20211012_163900664.jpg?format=1000w]
Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
www.loonlaketoolworks.com
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#16
(05-23-2022, 05:55 PM)enjuneer Wrote: The fine-thread adjuster and yoke offered by Reed Planes is likely a better solution for roughly the same cost. It is designed as a retrofit for Stanley planes Type 10 and newer.


[Image: PXL_20211012_163900664.jpg?format=1000w]

.................
The best of both worlds might be a combination star wheel with finer threads, but it would do nothing to reduce the friction generated by moving the blade against the force that keeps the iron clamped to the frog..The slack in the yoke mechanism was alway a bigger problem in my opinion.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#17
(05-23-2022, 02:06 PM)AHill Wrote: Would like to hear opinions from y'all.
IMO, speaking for myself, it's a <gasp> $40 solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

I tip my hat to Rob, I do like his teaching style and the way he explains things, but we have to realize that Rob is also a businessman, just like LN and LV. This type of tool strikes me as being more aligned to some of LVs tooline, TLN typically doesn't offer chiatchkas like that. not unless they're of real value. Scraper cards would be a case in point.
Alan
Geometry was the most critical/useful mathematics class I had, and it didn't even teach me mathematics.
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#18
Does he still sell the magnetic triangular thinge, some kind of training wheel? This star knob falls into the same category.

The depth adj knob should turn with finger grip unless one overtighten the lever cap , a beginner user error. I can always adjust the depth on the fly as I'm planing.

Simon
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#19
(05-24-2022, 12:38 AM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: Does he still sell the magnetic triangular thinge, some kind of training wheel? This star knob falls into the same category.

The depth adj knob should turn with finger grip unless one overtighten the lever cap , a beginner user error. I can always adjust the depth on the fly as I'm planing.

Simon

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The threads on the fine adjuster are very fine..look to be about 40ppi..Prone to wear quickly in that brass.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#20
(05-24-2022, 06:39 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: .....................
The threads on the fine adjuster are very fine..look to be about 40ppi..Prone to wear quickly in that brass.

Not to worry too much about the wear, Jack. The planes may not be used much. (Oh, I need to be spanked for saying this!).

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at www.inthewoodshop.com
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