Another old planer coming back to life!
#18
(05-24-2022, 05:43 AM)®smpr_fi_mac® Wrote: It's a 1953 Powermatic 16" CE.

I have a couple of the E16 models moving them alone was tricky.  One I had to strap the top to the trailer and lower slower slowly so it didn't tip out.  The second one I used a cherry picker to get out.  darn things are heavy
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#19
(06-03-2022, 01:30 PM)®smpr_fi_mac® Wrote: A buddy loaned me his portable bench top planer while this one is down (selling the 100 was a mistake!) and man, is it SLOW.  3/32" max cut...in pine.  I'm milling down walnut planks for a table.  I'm forced to cut at 1/64" at a time to prevent tearout.  It's torture!

I've never had the opportunity to use one of those benchtop planers.  What you report confirms my suspicions about their effectiveness. 
Decades back I did a big redwood job and only had a Powermatic 100 planer.  I started planing first thing in the morning.  By 1:00 AM I'd filled eleven 55 gallon drum liner bags with shavings.  Once you become accustomed to that kind of effectiveness, its got to be frustrating to go to a suitcase screamer.
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#20
(06-06-2022, 08:12 AM)Bob Vaughan Wrote: I've never had the opportunity to use one of those benchtop planers.  What you report confirms my suspicions about their effectiveness. 
Decades back I did a big redwood job and only had a Powermatic 100 planer.  I started planing first thing in the morning.  By 1:00 AM I'd filled eleven 55 gallon drum liner bags with shavings.  Once you become accustomed to that kind of effectiveness, its got to be frustrating to go to a suitcase screamer.


Before I picked up the 100, I had a Rigid portable planer.  It wasn't *terrible*, but was still slower and much louder.  This planer, a Harbor Freight piece, is terrible.


On the OWWM forum, I asked a question about setting up the CE but haven't gotten any responses yet.  Would you mind taking a look at it and helping me out?


https://owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=233645
Semper fi,
Brad

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#21
It still needs some fine tuning to get rid of some sniping on the outfeed and the knives need to be set a *bit* better, and there's a bad bearing on the head but it runs!

https://youtu.be/JQEfPdkrSIE
Semper fi,
Brad

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#22
Well done! Enjoy seeing those old made in the USA machines brought back to life.
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#23
I love to see old woodworking machines outperforming their new so called "replacements".

I brought an old Parks 12" planer back to life following Bob Vaughan's tutorial, and advice. It cuts beautifully! And it actually sounds like a powerful woodworking machine as yours does. I use a 3-1/4" x 12" x 6" round sheet metal adapter, reduced to 3", and can use a shop vac with a Thien Baffle on a 30 gal. barrel to keep up with the chips. It's easier to swap out a barrel than empty the D.C.. It generates a lot of chips, real fast. 

I also have a 24" that still has babbitt bearings and a square cutter-head. Variable speed is accomplished by positioning a leather sandwich wheel (changed to rubber) at the appropriate distance from center of the drive disk. Toro came out with a new infinitely variable speed riding lawnmower in the 1980's based on the same principal; from the 1800"s. A lot of snow blowers use this design now too.
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#24
(06-21-2022, 11:24 PM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: I love to see old woodworking machines outperforming their new so called "replacements".

I brought an old Parks 12" planer back to life following Bob Vaughan's tutorial, and advice. It cuts beautifully! And it actually sounds like a powerful woodworking machine as yours does. I use a 3-1/4" x 12" x 6" round sheet metal adapter, reduced to 3", and can use a shop vac with a Thien Baffle on a 30 gal. barrel to keep up with the chips. It's easier to swap out a barrel than empty the D.C.. It generates a lot of chips, real fast. 

I also have a 24" that still has babbitt bearings and a square cutter-head. Variable speed is accomplished by positioning a leather sandwich wheel (changed to rubber) at the appropriate distance from center of the drive disk. Toro came out with a new infinitely variable speed riding lawnmower in the 1980's based on the same principal; from the 1800"s. A lot of snow blowers use this design now too.


Oh yeah, the Powermatic 100 this is replacing was a joy to use.  If I weren't tilting to building tables I wouldn't have upgraded the size.  For that one I built a dust chute from plywood; I'll do the same here.  My DC is a 3hp Frakenunit that has a pair of 40 gallon bags that are easy-ish to empty. 

I used Bob's video on that planer and on this one!
Semper fi,
Brad

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