Advice on outfeed/work table
#11
Hello.

Im looking to build an outfeed/work table to fit on the end of my table saw. i want the table to be 6'x 6'. My main problem is which system to use, between T-track, dovetail clamps or dog holes. So really what im asking is what advantages to they have over each other and what material is best for each application? Right now im liking the dog holes but im a little worried on the cost of hardwood for the table top for a 6x6. i was thinking of using Maple as its cheapest?

any and all help is appreciated, thank you
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#12
How thick a top are you looking at? If you are going to build with 3/4 ply I would be hesitant to weaken the top by recessing t-track. Once you get to an inch and a half of thickness, then the structural consequences don't matter as much.

Personally, I like dog holes because they are easy and I already have a bunch of dogs.
Math is tough. Let's go shopping!
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#13
I didn't do this for the outfield table, but I have a workbench with T-tracks that is two layers of plywood and a layer of hardboard. It works pretty well, but the structure is supported by the bench itself (essentiall cabinet boxes).

These are the t-tracks that will accept a 3/8" bolt head. I also made some clamps that fit them out of some Dewalt clamps.

   
Project Blog Got it all up-to-date, and I promise to keep it up-to-date.
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#14
Thank you for the replies,

@ JohnnyEgo:

i haven't really thought about thickness, i suppose it would be what was needed for the type i intend to build. for t-track i would 3/4 base with 5/8 cut to size to "box" the tracks in. i too im leaning to dog holes, i think they look cool. in my head i feel like tracks and dovetails can be pulled apart but having never used them i dont know (hence the post) if dog holes probably maple at 3" thick. build it once and build it right (with limited knowledge lol....)

@lincmercguy

i assume the two layers of plywood are 3/4 so you can drive a 1-1/4 screw for the tracks? May i ask, does it feel like the tracks can be lifted off? i can be heavy handed at time so asking for that mainly. also, judging from your reply i assume you have a separate outfeed table and work bench? is that working out better or would you rather have one big piece? personal pros/cons?

i wanted a big all in one cus im kinda messy. i like having everything on the table when im working (even tho most the clamps are on a movable rack right behind me) i guess having a smaller table would force me to be cleaner. another reason for a large top is breaking down sheet goods. right now its a 6x4 at the end of the table saw so combined i have a 8x4 ( still not comfortable doing large rip cuts on a table saw. have the jess'em stock guides but still....)

again, thanks for the advice.
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#15
Yeah, two layers of 3/4. I forget the length of screws, but not that long. The important part is that anything clamped is not trying to pull the trying to pull the track up, it's clamped against the top of the track itself.

I actually have two benches and the outfeed. The outfeed table is very basic and folds out of the way when I need. I have a couple of small used cabinets that I roll underneath for storage and that's it.

The bench shown is my main bench. I do most of my work there and keep it clear of other junk. I have a smaller bench underneath a cleat wall that catches all of the junk and is where I set other items. Both have drawers for tools.
Project Blog Got it all up-to-date, and I promise to keep it up-to-date.
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#16
This will give you an idea of my setup. The bench front and center is for the kids and the top is made from an old door they took out at work.

Don't get too jealous of those and the tools, all of them were bought/built when prices were a lot more sane.

   
Project Blog Got it all up-to-date, and I promise to keep it up-to-date.
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#17
There are things you can do to make t-track more stout, the best of which is through bolts with a washer and nut on the other side. But if you can't through-bolt, epoxy can give you a permanent mount with a lot of strength. The third option is to tap the wood itself and use machine screws. I used that method to secure the t-tracks in my miter sled, with a little bit of CA glue to harden the wooden threads I cut.

I through bolted the t-tracks on my reloading bench, and I could torque down the clamps to the point of failure of the aluminum lips before it would lift out. But that is well past the point where whatever wood I might clamp in them would be crushed. In day to day use, as long as you didn't over do it, and you'd know, I think you would be fine.

I still vote for dogs, though.

Somewhere I have a picture of my old mega contractor saw table...
[Image: ts24.JPG]

[Image: ts27.JPG]

These days, I just use a height adjustable table I bought from
Home Depot and drilled a bunch of dog holes in.
Math is tough. Let's go shopping!
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#18
(06-01-2022, 08:04 PM)Leandre Wrote: Hello.

Im looking to build an outfeed/work table to fit on the end of my table saw. i want the table to be 6'x 6'. My main problem is which system to use, between T-track, dovetail clamps or dog holes. So really what im asking is what advantages to they have over each other and what material is best for each application? Right now im liking the dog holes but im a little worried on the cost of hardwood for the table top for a 6x6. i was thinking of using Maple as its cheapest?

any and all help is appreciated, thank you

Whatever system that you use, it is important that there are no proud edges to snag whatever is being cut on the TS.

Also, it needs to be thick enough that it does not sag under the weight of the outfeed.

If you want to be able to use hold downs, then there is a minimum thickness at the dog holes dictated by that as well.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#19
@ lincmercguy

that does sound like its very secure, might be worth giving it more thought. been thinking about this all night. 2ft outfeed table and a 6x2 work bench (same height so i can butt them up if needed) vs just one big 6x6 and follow your lead and stack 3/4 plywood for a heavy thick top and use tracks as much as i like dog holes i dont want to think about the cost of the hardwood on top.

ok so 3 hours after thinking about the above, maybe i can make a 6x4 out feed and a 2x6 hardwood bench but have the last 2 feet of the outfeed foldable so i have a nice 2ft gap in-between so i have 360 access around the bench, that would also bring down the cost of the hardwood needed.

your shop is huge, mines tiny >< i should tak pics and post maybe you guys can see if its ok and such

@ JohnnyEgo

holy crap thats really clean, the fold down it that with a piano hinge? i was thinking of something like this for mine, it looks really nice.

@ iclark

i was looking at using bench dog and the clamps possible skipping the holdfast just so i dont need to have that space underneath open for the long holds. what do you think would be a good thickness for a top for dog holes?i was thinking maybe 4" or would that be too low?

right now im really leaning on 4ft outfeed with a drop down and a 6x2 dog hole bench. I'll probably wait a bit longer and see if lumber prices go down. once again thanks for all the input.
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#20
Depending on what you intend to clamp you may be overthinking this. For heavy duty clamping to the tabletop nothing beats a 3" overhang around the apron of the table and you can crank the clamps as tight as you want. A series of dog holes in a 3/4" top in the middle allows the use of short dogs and L-clamps. L-clamps can lever down through the hole and work well for clamping in the middle of the table. Dogs used in the right place help to keep a work piece from moving under the clamps
T-track works ok if you keep it clean but my experience with it is it is full of wood chips every time I want to slide a clamp into it. I know this says as much about my house keeping as the utility of the T-track.
Proud maker of large quantities of sawdust......oh, and the occasional project!
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