Advice on outfeed/work table
#18
I understand about the space issues under the top if you are using holdfasts.

4" thick is way overkill for benchdogs. Do remember that the dogs need to be long enough that you can push them up from under the bench top.

The folding workstations that I have use 3/4" ply as the work surface and they were great for benchdogs when new. with time they have worn a bit and I need to be a little careful in some of the holes that the dogs do not drop through. The plastic dogs with the crown on top still work great even with the wear.

I would think that 2 layers of 3/4" ply would give a more-than-adequate bench top. If you want to use T-track(s) in addition to bench dogs, then you can top the plywood with something a little bit thicker that the T-track (as others have done above).

On the fold-down part attached to the TS, you might consider reclaiming as much floor space as possible by making the fold-down part almost reach the floor. You can leave enough room for a toe-kick (like kitchen cabinets) and add a short leg/foot at each end to support it. That way, you can stack stuff on that flat surface without worrying whether or not the TS will fall over from the weight. You can arrange things so that those legs/feet are alignment and latch when connecting the outfeed to the workbench.

just my $0.02, of course.
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#19
(06-02-2022, 06:33 PM)iclark Wrote: 4" thick is way overkill for benchdogs. Do remember that the dogs need to be long enough that you can push them up from under the bench top.

oh i didnt know this. maybe 3" is something i should consider.

On the fold-down part attached to the TS, you might consider reclaiming as much floor space as possible by making the fold-down part almost reach the floor. You can leave enough room for a toe-kick (like kitchen cabinets) and add a short leg/foot at each end to support it. That way, you can stack stuff on that flat surface without worrying whether or not the TS will fall over from the weight. You can arrange things so that those legs/feet are alignment and latch when connecting the outfeed to the workbench.

after looking at my space, im thinking of just doing a wide outfeed table like 30" and do a 6x2 work bench on casters and butt it against the outfeed. i doubt id move it much but would be an option is needed
if i need extra surface area for breaking down sheets i could use the roller stands. the wood whisperer did a bench with a channel down the centre and i really like that. so planning on going for something close to that but using southen yellow pine. i dont think i can afford hard maple. still got lots of other things to buy like a planer and drill press. iam gonna buy some reg dug-fir 2x4 and play around with making mortise in preparation for the legs on the work bench. how do you think using dowels for attaching the side beams? i just got the jess'em dowel jig with the 3/8 size. if the legs end up being 3.5 x3.5 could fit quite alot of dowels on them or is it a bad idea?

once again thanks for all the replies and thank you for all the info 
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#20
Melamine is a good choice. T tracks are useful, but have their drawbacks, the main one being they trap screws and glue and are a major PITA to clean out.

JohnnyEgo has a great setup.
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#21
(06-01-2022, 09:16 PM)lincmercguy Wrote: I didn't do this for the outfield table, but I have a workbench with T-tracks that is two layers of plywood and a layer of hardboard. It works pretty well, but the structure is supported by the bench itself (essentiall cabinet boxes).

These are the t-tracks that will accept a 3/8" bolt head. I also made some clamps that fit them out of some Dewalt clamps.
How did you adapt the clamps?
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#22
"How did you adapt the clamps?"

I found a piece of steel that fit the track fairly well and welded a piece of it onto the end of the clamps bar.

The first time I tried it, I used a couple of cheapo track clamps and welded bolt heads on to get the width right. But the track clamps didn't have enough holding force to keep things in place. The Dewalt clamps have enough force, but also enough to bend the bar I welded on, so I can't crank it down all of the way.
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#23
so, i called around some lumber yards around me asking for the price of maple and southen yellow. most didnt have yellow pine and those that did had small amount. maple was $9 LF s2s (i dont have a planer or jointer (planer is on the list but the dewalt seems to be off amazon now and since there's no immediate need i was gonna wait to see if there might a 7/4th sale or something)) rough lumber was about $6,50 BF. he also said he had superior alder for $3BF which is a lot more manageable but is alder any good?

So now i have more question and less clearer on what i want.
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#24
(06-07-2022, 08:43 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: Melamine is a good choice.  T tracks are useful, but have their drawbacks, the main one being they trap screws and glue and are a major PITA to clean out.

JohnnyEgo has a great setup.

i was thinking, if i decided to use tracks was nail them directly to the plywood and fill in the gaps with 5/8 mdf so i didnt have to route out a dado. that way if one section needed replacing i could just cut out the same size and replace. as for gluing i think im gonna start putting paper under to help keep things clean. with the price of lumber so high i really cant justify the cost when i need other tools too.
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