Install new outside faucet
#11
I'm at a dilemma. I'm pretty handy with household projects and I want to install an outside faucet. I climbed into the craw space and it looks like I'll have to install a T into the existing 3/4" copper water line. I feel pretty confident with drilling a hole and installing the frost free (?) faucet. My major concern is putting in the T and connecting it to the faucet. I'm worried about cutting the right size opening in the water line.

I appears to me to be a pretty straight forward project. I've been told by several pros that I should solder the fittings and not use compression fittings.

Competent help is appreciated. I have a plumber coming Friday to give me an estimate but I think I can get the job done for a lot less then they charge.

Thanks in advance

Jim
Jim
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#12
Why no compression fitting???


Little story for you:

We have an outside faucet that runs under our screen porch.  Usually I drain it in the fall, but apparently I didn't get all the water out because when I went to turn it on a few weeks ago, the copper pipe under the deck was leaking...it must have burst over the winter.

I've soldered pipe before so I figured "what the heck...let's do it now."  Well, for some reason the solder didn't stick the 1st time (even after emeryboard-cleaning it and fluxing it).  It leaked a little bit.  I cut that section out and tried resoldering it again...same results.


My neighbor, who owns a very successful HVAC company let me use his compression tool and 2 fittings and it hasn't leaked since.

You got a friend who's a plumber??? Maybe you can borrow his tools.


(it only cost me 2 buy-ins ($60) at our subsequent poker game for the use of his tools and 4 compression fittings.   Yep, you guessed it....the copper tube separated further out towards the faucet, necessitating the add'l compression fittings.

His parting words to me were, "You know what.....next time this happens just let me fix it for you for free."   Nice to have generous neighbors.
Dumber than I appear
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#13
(06-14-2022, 03:42 PM)Dumb_Polack Wrote: Why no compression fitting???


Little story for you:

We have an outside faucet that runs under our screen porch.  Usually I drain it in the fall, but apparently I didn't get all the water out because when I went to turn it on a few weeks ago, the copper pipe under the deck was leaking...it must have burst over the winter.

I've soldered pipe before so I figured "what the heck...let's do it now."  Well, for some reason the solder didn't stick the 1st time (even after emeryboard-cleaning it and fluxing it).  It leaked a little bit.  I cut that section out and tried resoldering it again...same results.


My neighbor, who owns a very successful HVAC company let me use his compression tool and 2 fittings and it hasn't leaked since.

You got a friend who's a plumber??? Maybe you can borrow his tools.


(it only cost me 2 buy-ins ($60) at our subsequent poker game for the use of his tools and 4 compression fittings.   Yep, you guessed it....the copper tube separated further out towards the faucet, necessitating the add'l compression fittings.

His parting words to me were, "You know what.....next time this happens just let me fix it for you for free."   Nice to have generous neighbors.

I've been told by a plumber at HD you can't trust compression fittings and so did the that's helped me for years at the Ace HW store. Does your friend rely on compression fittings or does he solder?
Jim
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#14
For a 3/4 x 3/4 x !/2 tee, you would cut out 1/2". For a 3/4 x 3/4 x 3/4 tee, you would cut out 3/4". It's easier to clean (i.e. sand with plumbers cloth) before you cut the pipe. Clean the fitting too, even if it's new and shiny. You will have to take out a few hangers to get the 3/4" extra space needed to physically install the fitting. If you've done much soldering at all, you'll know if it's a good joint before you even turn the water on. You'll also know that with one drop of water during the soldering process, all bets are off. 

That being said; I wouldn't hesitate using a Shark-bite ("push to connect") fitting for that application. They're not the same as a compression fitting that uses a Ferrell and compression nut. Those work fine for me in 1/4" and 3/8" O.D. sizes, but I've had issues with larger sizes. 

Plumbers used to say that Shark-bite fittings won't last long term like soldered fittings will. "Those O-rings are gonna dry out an' it'll leak." I don't hear as many critical reviews now that most of them are changing to copper press fittings.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#15
In a situation like this, I would also use Sharkbites.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


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#16
(06-14-2022, 04:48 PM)Halfathumb Wrote: I've been told by a plumber at HD you can't trust compression fittings and so did the that's helped me for years at the Ace HW store. Does your friend rely on compression fittings or does he solder?

He says he hasn't soldered in years.

And he owns a VERY successful HVAC company.
Dumber than I appear
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#17
Sharkbite turns this into a 5 minute job.
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#18
I bought everything I need to include Shark Bite connectors. Now I just need to work up the nerve to do the job. The guy at Ace HW that I've trusted for years and sid the Shark Bite in my application would be good.

Wish me luck!

Jim
Jim
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#19
Take your time cutting the pipe. Neatness counts when fitting SharkBites...you want a clean, smooth burr free cut on the copper so the O-ring in the fitting doesn't get nicked. DAMHIKT....

Otherwise very simple.
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#20
While you are in there, and if it's available, run a hot water spigot also. That's what I have. You would be surprised how handy it is.
Sometimes it's better to keep your mouth shut, and have the world think you a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
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