What do you use for wiping on oil poly?
#11
Question 
I buy the "t-shirt" type bags of white rags from the big box store.  They're *perfect*...once I have a couple coats on and the surface is perfectly smooth. 

I sand to 220 before applying.  Within a few full-length strokes down the length of a table top they start shedding straggler fibers.  I've gotten around this by sanding back down the flaws but would like to avoid that. 

Help?
Semper fi,
Brad

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#12
If you say with cotton T shirts, it's best to use old ones that have been washed many times, they're less likely to have lint problems. Some time back I switched to paper towels. Not the kitchen counter type, but the blue paper shop towels you see in the auto section at Walmart and all the auto parts places. I fold them into a flat pad and use the edge of the pad to wipe the varnish. Consider trying it at least once and see what you think....I know some guys have tried them and wasn't happy with them for some reason.
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#13
(06-26-2022, 03:53 PM)fredhargis Wrote: If you say with cotton T shirts, it's best to use old ones that have been washed many times, they're less likely to have lint problems. Some time back I switched to paper towels. Not the kitchen counter type, but the blue paper shop towels you see in the auto section at Walmart and all the auto parts places. I fold them into a flat pad and use the edge of the pad to wipe the varnish. Consider trying it at least once and see what you think....I know some guys have tried them and wasn't happy with them for some reason.

I do the same. I tear one sheet into quarters and then fold one quarter three times. This gives a nice rounded edge to use like a brush to stroke on the finish. I have never had any issues with lint.
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#14
Alright.  I'll give those blue paper towels a try.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#15
I use a 2 or 3" foam brush to apply. Then follow up with a lint free old Tee shirt rag again long strokes with the grain. Sanding with a 320 foam pad in-between coats.
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#16
(06-26-2022, 06:11 PM)®smpr_fi_mac® Wrote: Alright.  I'll give those blue paper towels a try.
Bill Tindall
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#17
(06-27-2022, 12:21 AM)lift mechanic Wrote: I use a 2 or 3" foam brush to apply. Then follow up with a lint free old Tee shirt rag again long strokes with the grain. Sanding with a 320 foam pad in-between coats.

I don't use this product but I wondered why a foam brush would not be better than folding a paper towel.
Bill Tindall
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#18
(06-27-2022, 07:45 AM)Bill Tindall Wrote: I don't use this product but I wondered why a foam brush would not be better than folding a paper towel.

A foam brush is OK for the first coat to get the grain filled, but a blue paper towel works better after that because it doesn't leave as much on the wood and reduces the risk of lap marks, ridges, ets.   I've had good luck using the paper towel by itself, but also by filling it with T shirt material or even another paper towel to make sort of a rubber out of it like for French polishing.  

John
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#19
(06-27-2022, 07:45 AM)Bill Tindall Wrote: I don't use this product but I wondered why a foam brush would not be better than folding a paper towel.

Maybe I'm using the wrong foam brushes, but I find that, when used with a solvent finishes, they soon get soft and floppy like a wet noodle and are then hard to control.
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#20
(06-29-2022, 10:12 AM)Willyou Wrote: Maybe I'm using the wrong foam brushes, but I find that, when used with a solvent finishes, they soon get soft and floppy like a wet noodle and are then hard to control.

That's true with finishes that are cut with alcohol or lacquer thinner, but I've never had a problem using a foam brush in oil based finishes cut with mineral spirits.  

John
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