Need blade info. for cutting cultured marble
#9
vanity top. I read a diamond blade will clog and melt the material. I also read you can use a regular carbide fine tooth wood blade. 
Seems like the wood blade would result in a catastrophic explosion as soon as it touched the vanity. I’d like to avoid that since I paid quite a bit for the vanity top.

I need to cut an inch off each end so I can drop it into a recessed area.
VH07V  
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#10
Bob Vila recommends using a masonry blade. I have also heard of using a carbide tipped blade, but installing it backwards as is done for cutting vinyl siding...
Good luck
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#11
If you bought it at the big box store, I'd see if they have a matching backsplash that I could buy and experiment with before committing to the counter top. Off hand, I'd guess a fine tooth carbide blade since it is mostly resin.
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#12
Done this waaaaaaaaay to many times. A regular carbide tipped blade and a belt sander to fine tune it. Very dusty. It's basically the top "gel" coat if you will that's the tough layer. The rest is just filler per say. We do it all of the time. Oh, if you can, cut it upside down, it will chip.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#13
A diamond blade. Not the ones with the flutes or teeth. The smooth round ones in the tile section at the big box stores. I bought a new one yesterday for cutting 1/2" think porcelain tile. My old one lasted 5 bathrooms and 2 kitchens. Like everything else... they've gone up. I paid about $50 for a 7". There's cheaper ones in the $30 range that should do fine. Just not as much diamonds impregnated in the blade.
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#14
Success! I used a masonry blade to cut it. Very dusty but no explosions.
Went to Lowes to buy the blade and someone (surprisingly) was at the tool area and asked me if I needed help.
Asked for masonry blades and he took me right to them.
VH07V  
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#15
Thanks for the follow-up. That helps everyone.
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#16
As they say, more than one to do it. I just like hearing from the rest of the Woodnetters which ways don't work. Saves time.

Glad that the OP was able to fix it.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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