Drawknife - whats a good brand?
#9
Looking for a drawknife - whats a good brand to get?

I have checked flea markets and other places locally old ones that are pretty beat people think are worth a fortune.  If I have to put that kind of work and time into an old one, I might as well get a new one.

Thanks,
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#10
(08-12-2022, 03:20 PM)efmrrt Wrote: Looking for a drawknife - whats a good brand to get?

I have checked flea markets and other places locally old ones that are pretty beat people think are worth a fortune.  If I have to put that kind of work and time into an old one, I might as well get a new one.

Thanks,

I'm sure there are many, but when I'm not sure - these are always quality

https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/it...hterm=draw
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#11
I have a couple of old Witherby drawknives. The LN versions are based on these. Nice.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at www.inthewoodshop.com
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#12
Rumour Control says the Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co. made some decent drawknives....
   
And this happens to be my 6" PEXTO.....
   
Handles are worn, but intact, and not loose.    Razor sharp edge
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#13
Another vote for vintage Witherby. Just make sure it's in good shape and the handles aren't loose. From a modern maker standpoint, I like Barr drawknives. Excellent quality and several different models for available different work. Another gem is the Flexcut Draw Knife. Very lightweight and super sharp - but really for light work since it's small.

I highly recommend visiting some websites of woodworkers who use drawknives. You really want to choose a knife suitable to the work you intend to do with it. Chairmaking drawknives might not suit work to debark logs. There are other subtle things that make a difference e.g. whether the edge is cambered or straight, angle of the handles (in/out and up/down), etc. For finer work, a spokeshave might be more appropriate than a draw knife.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#14
(08-15-2022, 07:37 AM)AHill Wrote: Another vote for vintage Witherby.  Just make sure it's in good shape and the handles aren't loose.  From a modern maker standpoint, I like Barr drawknives.  Excellent quality and several different models for available different work.  Another gem is the Flexcut Draw Knife.  Very lightweight and super sharp - but really for light work since it's small.

I highly recommend visiting some websites of woodworkers who use drawknives.  You really want to choose a knife suitable to the work you intend to do with it.  Chairmaking drawknives might not suit work to debark logs.  There are other subtle things that make a difference e.g. whether the edge is cambered or straight, angle of the handles (in/out and up/down), etc.  For finer work, a spokeshave might be more appropriate than a draw knife.
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I'll throw another good maker's name in the mix...James Swan...very hard to find in decent condition and pricey when you do.
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#15
Greenlee, too.

But there are plenty of other good vintage brands out there.
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#16
Most of the vintage brands, if not all were forged, which I think makes for a tougher cutting edge. Pexto, Greenlee, Witherby, Swan, D.R. Barton, Keen Kutter, Buck Brothers, and Fulton are some of the vintage makers who make excellent drawknives.

Modern makers include Two Cherries, Pfeil, Gransfors, Stubai (Austian), Ray Iles, Barr Tool, Flexcut, Robert Larson, Timber Tuff and probably a host of other makers. Personally, if it's modern production, look for forged steel. Pfeil , Ray Iles, Barr, and Flexcut all have good reputations. Two Cherries used to get lots of rave reviews for their chisels. I just don't know how their drawknives measure up. Lee Valley also offers a PM-V11 drawknife. The steel alone is intriguing, because it'll stay sharp a long time.

The thing with a drawknife is similar to chisels - there's a strong factor of personal taste that factors into how it will perform for you. Fit and comfort when using one is as important as the steel. If you can get a couple of vintage ones for cheap, that will help you find what works for you.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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