Small Set Screw for Door Handle?
#9
I've got a bunch of old-fashioned door handles that use small, conical set screws.  I need a bunch of replacements, but can' find anywhere that sells them.



The large set screw in the photo is a 1/4" from Amazon -- It's a tad too big, and wont thread through the hole at all.



   


   



Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

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#10
Just thinking. I'd start with the right dia. and thread pitch in brass. That should be easy to find in a machine screw. Then I'd need a hacksaw blade, a file, pliers (or vice grip), a drill to make it easier, and about 1 minute for each one. Now I could also consider cheating a little by using a long machine screw to lock one knob onto the shaft and cutting it off flush, then with the remaining, make a set screw or just cut it so it doesn't stick out too far for the other knob.
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#11
I just did a quick search on McMaster Carr using 1/4" as the length. Found a few options. You can change the search options for more results. I'm not sure that these are what you are looking for but maybe.

https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/set-scre...-screws-7/
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#12
Just make some. Grind a threaded rod to a point. Cut to length and cut sth slit. Or. Just uce a allen set screw and grind the tip to a poit.
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#13
That’s a lot more work than I was hoping for.
Smile

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#14
you might try here.
Is the problem the thread size or length? One of the places sells brass set screws that are 10-24.

https://www.historichouseparts.com/?targ...luding=all
or here
https://www.houseofantiquehardware.com/

So do the doors that go with that have a mortise lock?

I don't know if that site has it but you can buy replacement spindles that have holes through the then length wouldn't be an issue.

Is the problem the thread size or length? One of the places above sells brass set screws that are 10-24.
mark
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#15
First, you don’t need that sharp a point. Second, I wouldn’t mess with brass screws, point the holes to the bottom and use standard steel set screws. Third, buy a 1/4 - 20 tap and run it into the existing holes so a common screw will fit. Done.
Blackhat

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#16
(08-19-2022, 02:06 PM)blackhat Wrote: First, you don’t need that sharp a point. Second, I wouldn’t mess with brass screws, point the holes to the bottom and use standard steel set screws. Third, buy a 1/4 - 20 tap and run it into the existing holes so a common screw will fit. Done.

Funny this popped up today as I just had to swap out an old glass handled knob in my kids room.  I have a large supply but most are clear and the knob I replaced has a bit of purple in the glass and the plan is to eventually tap it to the next size up and a new set screw.  Today was all about making it so they could get out of the room.
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