return air duct
#11
I'm framing out a new closet in our MBR (10' final x 2' interior).  10ft puts the closet wall between the duct and that light switch so I need to extend the duct out to the room. (That is not the final wall color)

   

I thought of going straight out but the bottom of the duct would be at the top of the new bifold doors (our walls are less than 8').  So the better solution to me is to extend it out and turn 90deg to the side.

   

I have not worked with ducting before.
--How do I marry the new ducting in with the old?
--Do they sell premade 90s or do I cut and tape?  That's a 14"x8" duct.
--What else am I missing?

Thank you,
Paul
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#12
might be able to find one of these local

https://www.acandb.com/brands/jones-mfg-...mQEALw_wcB
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#13
(08-21-2022, 06:28 AM)atgcpaul Wrote: I'm framing out a new closet in our MBR (10' final x 2' interior).  10ft puts the closet wall between the duct and that light switch so I need to extend the duct out to the room. (That is not the final wall color)



I thought of going straight out but the bottom of the duct would be at the top of the new bifold doors (our walls are less than 8').  So the better solution to me is to extend it out and turn 90deg to the side.



I have not worked with ducting before.
--How do I marry the new ducting in with the old?
--Do they sell premade 90s or do I cut and tape?  That's a 14"x8" duct.
--What else am I missing?

Thank you,
Paul
8"x14" is still sold, at least in half sections. A supply house will have the 90s for sure.

I still use tape sometimes on small sections, but the current "best practice" is to slather the joints with polymeric sealant (Mastic or something like it). Looks terrible if exposed, but I assume there will be a soffit around it so have at it. Probably the best solution for a concealed joint.

For joining, I would probably cut away the drywall and expose the flange. If you can do a "flange to flange" connection loading the joint with sealant and then screwing it together would probably be best. If that doesn't work (or can't) then your best bet is probably to open it up more and do a standard slip joint. That will need to be sealed though since it's all but certain that the new section will go inside the old, so you'll have internal resistance.
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#14
(08-21-2022, 06:28 AM)atgcpaul Wrote: ....

I thought of going straight out but the bottom of the duct would be at the top of the new bifold doors (our walls are less than 8').  So the better solution to me is to extend it out and turn 90deg to the side.

--What else am I missing?

Thank you,
Paul

Truth is, you don't even have to extend the duct.

Leave it as is, and install a grill over a hole in the side where you show it.

The return will draw air from that hole, through the closet, into the duct.

It's similar to the contractor's term of "panning", where return lines are often no more than stud cavities or joist cavities connected to ducts.
[Image: usa-flag-waving-united-states-of-america...if-clr.gif]
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#15
(08-21-2022, 12:50 PM)barnowl Wrote: Truth is, you don't even have to extend the duct.

Leave it as is, and install a grill over a hole in the side where you show it.

The return will draw air from that hole, through the closet, into the duct.

It's similar to the contractor's term of "panning", where return lines are often no more than stud cavities or joist cavities connected to ducts.

That's probably what I would do too. No real need for any duct.
Another option is a louvered closet door.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#16
(08-21-2022, 09:46 AM)tomsteve Wrote: might be able to find one of these local

https://www.acandb.com/brands/jones-mfg-...mQEALw_wcB

Nice!  I didn't know what it was called.  I'll call around today.  Even with an additional $20 shipping from this place you linked, it's still not bad to me.


(08-21-2022, 12:50 PM)barnowl Wrote: Truth is, you don't even have to extend the duct.

Leave it as is, and install a grill over a hole in the side where you show it.

The return will draw air from that hole, through the closet, into the duct.

It's similar to the contractor's term of "panning", where return lines are often no more than stud cavities or joist cavities connected to ducts.

(08-21-2022, 07:18 PM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: That's probably what I would do too. No real need for any duct.
Another option is a louvered closet door.

Yes, we're using louvered doors, but I think it still violates the code.  Plus, I think this would draw dust into the closet.

https://codes.iccsafe.org/s/IRC2021P2/pa...SecM1602.2


Paul
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#17
Quote:4.Return air shall not be taken from a closet, bathroom, toilet room, kitchen, garage, mechanical room, boiler room, furnace room or unconditioned attic.



Wow...

I can. understand and agree with all the above, but no the closet exclusion.

Oh well...

If that's the case, you can still do the same... just box the corner in between existing and new grill with plywood.

No real need for actual sheet metal ducting.
[Image: usa-flag-waving-united-states-of-america...if-clr.gif]
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#18
(08-22-2022, 10:07 AM)barnowl Wrote: Wow...

I can. understand and agree with all the above, but no the closet exclusion.

Oh well...

If that's the case, you can still do the same... just box the corner in between existing and new grill with plywood.

No real need for actual sheet metal ducting.

I'd just drywall the connected areas.
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#19
(08-22-2022, 11:25 AM)joe1086 Wrote: I'd just drywall the connected areas.

+1. If you can't pull air from a closet. Just frame in a plenum and put a register on the side of the closet.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#20
How many closets have you seen jammed so full of crap a register would be useless. That can have a negative effect on the equipment.
Blackhat

Bad experiences come from poor decisions. So do good stories. 


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