Ripping a Stopped bevel?
#11
I’ve got an application I’ve never tried to do before:

I want to build a Faux box beam with 45 degree beveled edges such that it looks seamless.
However, one face board needs to be about 16” longer than the other 2 faces (protruding on both sides).
This requires the rip for the longest board to be stopped.

The stop on the back end is easy.

Getting into the cut doesn’t seem safe or accurate.

How would you approach this?
If not the table saw, what esle?

I can fall back to butt joints and a small reveal but the continuous flow using the bevels would look great.

My only idea so far is rip into the cut, then glue in a matching spline.
Gary

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#12
Could you position your board at the starting point of the cut and slowly raise your blade at the angle into the wood? That seems safer than trying to lower a board onto an angled blade
Big Grin
Not sure how you control the start of the cut by raising the blade to a particular height during operation.
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#13
I would use a router and a bevel bit (I'm assuming it's a 45 degree bevel).
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#14
Tested on TS with a 45-degree ZTP.
That’s it—simple and safe.
Test cut on scrap is very close and the scrap isn’t milled perfectly square.

However, the customer said there may be too many grain changes in the planned location.
The butt with reveal may actually look cleaner.

Testing scrap cut glue-up …

I’ll have to test with the real material…


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Gary

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#15
What is a ZTP? Forgive my ignorance
Big Grin
I hope it works out for you!
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#16
Zero-tolerance plate (or throat plate).

Thanks for your suggestion.
If necessary, I can test Garry’s suggestion but this is looking good.
Gary

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#17
I did this years ago with a butt joint. Then, after the glue was dry, I cut a 45 deg by hand with a draw knife so that the bevel started right at the joint line. Using the draw knife, I purposely left a scallopy surface. As a result the beam has a somewhat hand hewn look and the joint visually disappears. You could do the same using a router to make a smooth bevel with a similar Jointless look.
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#18
Thanks for your suggestion.
A rough hewn look isn’t fitting with the rest of the space.
I unclamped the test and it demonstrated the design is very good.
Grain directions won’t be an issue.
When I make the real component, I’ll add several small blocks inside to simplify the glue-up.
Gary

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#19
I would "miter-fold" that during assembly. Place boards together, bevel down, on flat surface and apply tape across joint every 3' or so. When you've got the joints nice and tight put 2" tape down the seams then add more across the joint. Gently flip it over and apply glue. Fold the joints closed and use more tape to keep them closed; no clamps required and no glue on the face side.
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#20
I know you meant 3” and this is basically the plan.
I’ve done 8’ long, 45-degree outside corner bevels.
Thanks.
Gary

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