Framing inspection
#11
We want to create a 9ft passageway in a load-bearing wall between two rooms.  I worked with a structural engineer, got drawings/specs, and now have a building permit from the county.  

The opening will be a framed doorway and doesn't go all the way up to the ceiling.  So before I go crazy on ripping out drywall this weekend to see what lies beneath, I got to thinking...do I need to have all the new framing exposed for the inspector to see or can I just cut out as much drywall as I need so then I don't have to take down crown molding and re-drywall?  That's assuming I can remove the studs (after temp walls) and cleanly cut the drywall nails with a sawzall without damaging the drywall.  The new king studs, LVL beams, and double jack studs would slide into the existing drywall pocket--probably harder than it sounds, though.

In theory, it would require the least amount of disturbance and really no drywalling, but then how does an inspector inspect it, or is this common for them?

Thanks,
Paul

PS--yes, I also have to add a support column under one of the new jack studs.  The other side already sits on a pier in my crawlspace.
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#12
Best bet is to call the permit office and ask the inspector. Maryland, correct? In AA County they've been pretty helpful on the phone with me with similar issues. Call early in the morning...
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#13
(09-15-2022, 08:46 AM)joe1086 Wrote: Best bet is to call the permit office and ask the inspector. Maryland, correct? In AA County they've been pretty helpful on the phone with me with similar issues. Call early in the morning...

Yeah, that's what I should do.  I'm being paranoid the permit office is going to flag me as "special".  
Laugh
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#14
Make sure to take pics at every step of the project so that the inspector can see that you did what you were supposed to. Most reasonable inspectors will work with you if youre trying to pull one over on them.
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#15
(09-15-2022, 09:49 AM)atgcpaul Wrote: I'm being paranoid the permit office is going to flag me as "special".  
Laugh

I know what you mean. I built an complex elevated porch last year and acted as my own GC/laborer/grunt. I found calling ahead to the permit office and chatting with the inspectors to answer questions was pretty easy. When time came for the final he signed off from 25' away. 

Of course YMMV...
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#16
(09-15-2022, 08:46 AM)joe1086 Wrote: Best bet is to call the permit office and ask the inspector. Maryland, correct? In AA County they've been pretty helpful on the phone with me with similar issues. Call early in the morning...

What Joe said ...

But my guess is the inspector needs to see that you've followed what was approved in the structural engineer's plans.  I would say that he need to see that you've used the correct sized header, made out of the correct material (doubled 2X's, LVL, etc.) and is supported by the correct number of jack studs at each end, and that the load under the jack studs are carried down to a footer below.  Also, that there are proper fasteners to the header and the joists above.

Just a guess. 
Rolleyes
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#17
(09-15-2022, 05:00 PM)cams2705 Wrote: What Joe said ...

But my guess is the inspector needs to see that you've followed what was approved in the structural engineer's plans.  I would say that he need to see that you've used the correct sized header, made out of the correct material (doubled 2X's, LVL, etc.) and is supported by the correct number of jack studs at each end, and that the load under the jack studs are carried down to a footer below.  Also, that there are proper fasteners to the header and the joists above.

Just a guess. 
Rolleyes

I emailed the planning office this afternoon to see what they'd say.  We'll see.
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#18
(09-15-2022, 08:08 PM)atgcpaul Wrote: I emailed the planning office this afternoon to see what they'd say.  We'll see.

Well, silence is golden, I suppose.  No word from the office in over a day and I don't want to waste the weekend waiting.  I just demoed one wall beyond the doorway, found some new-to-me stuff so I am going all the way to the ceiling to eliminate any second guessing.
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#19
(09-15-2022, 09:49 AM)atgcpaul Wrote: Yeah, that's what I should do.  I'm being paranoid the permit office is going to flag me as "special".  
Laugh

I work in the permit office and we think all applicants / builders are 'special'.   That said, we would you prefer to call rather then assume.   I would have enough exposed to verify the full load path for the headers support studs... all the way down.   That said, we usually respect a structural engineer who has submitted a sealed design as he is assuming the responsibility.
WoodNET... the new safespace
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#20
The inspector has to be able to see all "new work".
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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