Good Project for a 6 Year Old?
#9
My boy wants to build something. He wants to start with a castle, but I figure his first project should be a little less ambitious. He’s not really getting the hang of hammering yet. He kind of pushes the hammer down, instead of swinging it. And I’m not sure if I should let him use a drill/driver or a small hand saw. (His biggest problem is that he doesn’t like to take instructions.)

Any suggestions?

(I remember a while back someone posted a video of his 2 year old hammering nails into a board like a pro. I was impressed then, and I’m more impressed now.)

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#10
This reminds me of a great memory when my boy was that age and we did a wood project.

He and I  made a quick drawing with his ruler and hatch paper of a simple bird house, used 
6 pieces of pine wood  and had him help with hand saw cuts , pilot drill and hammer the nails in,  Pre drilling made sure 
the nails would be easy to drive in.  Took all the time needed , no rush and it was pure joy for each of us,
He painted it red.  Thanks for allowing me to share the experience... 

Enjoy your a lucky man,  
Smile


   
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#11
My granddaughter started drilling holes in scrap using the drill press at about 4.
My 4 year old grandson did a kit box for his dad with me.
He nailed roughly half of it, then told me to do the rest.

What about a typical toolbox tote?
If you cut most of the parts beforehand, and drill pilots in key positions, he’ll probably be good to go.

The Orange bigbox has a castle kit.
Gary

Please don’t quote the trolls.
Liberty, Freedom and Individual Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
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#12
How about a simple bat house.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
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#13
Did a couple birdhouses with the gd when she was about that age, only let her use the pnuematic stapler...
Laugh

Ed
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#14
I think the bird house is a great idea for a first project.

Thanks.

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#15
A simple step stool might be a good first project.  You can either use threaded inserts and machine screws to hold it together or get some wood taps and screw directly into the wood with 1/4-20 pan head screws.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#16
(09-18-2022, 10:45 AM)David Stone Wrote: My boy wants to build something.  He wants to start with a castle, but I figure his first project should be a little less ambitious.  He’s not really getting the hang of hammering yet.  He kind of pushes the hammer down, instead of swinging it.  And I’m not sure if I should let him use a drill/driver or a small hand saw.  (His biggest problem is that he doesn’t like to take instructions.)

Any suggestions?

(I remember a while back someone posted a video of his 2 year old hammering nails into a board like a pro.  I was impressed then, and I’m more impressed now.)

First, if he wants to build a castle, let him build a castle.  It may not look like what you think a castle should look like, but let him guide the project.  Don't show any dissatisfaction at all with the work in progress or completed work and it's very likely your son will enjoy it.

Second, I would not be concerned about the safety of a hand drill or hand saw.  Teach him how to use them and he'll be fine.  If you aren't a hand tool user, this is a great time to learn.  He may bleed a little, but nothing serious will happen and that will be a great lesson.

When my son was his age, I made a bunch of nailing boards for birthday presents.  Take a 2x piece of lumber, write his name on it in big letters.  Then drill pilot holes along the letters.  Plane off the writing.  Then give him safety glasses, a 7 oz hammer, and 3d (1.25") nails.  He can drive the nails completely into the board and they won't go through.  I get the hammers at Ace Hardware.  The lighter hammer and pilot hole will give him a lot more confidence.  Also make sure he is hammer on a surface that won't bounce (not concrete).

I think Carpentry for Children by Lester Walker is a good place for a child to start because it's written to children.  There are several simple projects like stilts.  The last project is a coaster car, which my son was able to build by himself when he was nine:  https://www.mwells.org/woodworking/proje...aster-car/

For adults, I really like Woodworking with Kids by Richard Starr.  Starr was a shop teacher for all ages of kids, so he has a lot of experience with what kids can and can't do.  For example, he said that many young kids like making "a person," which would have never occurred to me.

Finally, in perhaps too much of a coincidence, I wrote a short bedtime story book about a father teaching a son to drive nails with a hammer.  It's a book you could read to your son at bedtime or he may be able to read to you.  I usually only sell about 1 or 2 copies a year,  so Amazon makes it hard to find, but here's the direct link:  https://www.amazon.com/Daddy-Can-We-Play...1449918573

Let us know how it goes.

Mark
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