Garage Door Opener Problems - Liftmaster Model 1280R
#18
My 20 year old Liftmaster does the click/fail occasionally but I have not tried to fix it.

Could it be a relay assuming it has one? I had a car that failed to start every few months or so, after a few years of this I finally isolated it to a fuel pump relay that had oxidized contacts. I currently have a car that only has about 1V across the rear defroster - may be the same type of issue.

If it has a relay perhaps you can remove the relay cover to get a look at the contacts.
Reply
#19
(09-19-2022, 04:16 AM)KC Wrote: I suspect that 'quality' of a new unit might be lesser than one 20 years old... so it may be worth fixing.  

Amateur question... have you unplugged it for a few minutes AFTER all the things you've done?

Yes, I did.  No change.
Reply
#20
(09-19-2022, 01:25 AM)ShopStud Wrote: The sensors seem to be working.  I have green lights at both ends; however, if the beam is interrupted, the green light flickers at one end.

I ran into this today at an inspection. The door opened but wouldn't close. The lights came on and I heard the click. Both green lights on.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

Reply
#21
I just ordered a new control panel for a 2006 era 1/2 hp Liftmaster from Ebay for a customer; used but guaranteed to work, $60. I had "repaired" the existing circuit board by soldering jumpers across a few melted tracers a few years ago. I got it working on the third try after closer examination with a magnifying glass. I don't want to try that method again. This replacement will also get a surge protector in the outlet.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply
#22
(09-19-2022, 08:36 PM)Cabinet Monkey Wrote: ShopStud
The connections to the motor are not easy to disconnect.  Unfortunately, there's no detailed connectivity schematic that I can refer to, to figure out what to disconnect and how to feed power to the motor without blowing everything up.  Figuring this out without a diagram, with limited access to the board (because of the manner in which it is mounted and the way the wires run in), while perched on a ladder, is not much fun
Sad

I wish I could get my hands on a wiring schematic !


First, take the unit down so you can work on it on a bench.  It’s not doing you much good up there if if it’s not functioning.  It’ll be a lot safer too 
Yes

I suspect the motor’s wires are not soldered to the controller - which means they can easily be disconnected to test.

https://www.garagedoorsupplyco.com/Liftm...c_287.html

Thanks very much.  I will take the opener down this weekend and carry out the diagnostics.  Will be a lot easier to do on my kitchen table.  The link to the diagrams and parts list is good, but does not provide a wiring diagram.  Would have made my life a lot easier.
Reply
#23
(09-21-2022, 12:59 AM)ShopStud Wrote: Thanks very much.  I will take the opener down this weekend and carry out the diagnostics.  Will be a lot easier to do on my kitchen table.  The link to the diagrams and parts list is good, but does not provide a wiring diagram.  Would have made my life a lot easier.

Pretty sure you’ll never find a board schematic.  It’s not a serviceable part so there’s no real need for a schematic to be out in the wild.
Reply
#24
Start with bright light and magnifying glass. The tracers on the board are prone to melting. You might get lucky and just need a jumper or two.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.