Another framing question
#8
I watched a couple of days of house framing while I was in Kentucky earlier this week (Louisville metro). 

Big Pulte house.   They built the entire two story side wall (with high cielings), house wrapped it, then stood it up with a lift thingy.  That was interesting (scary) to watch.  Not sure they do it like that all the time, because from the first time they started lifting until it was actually up and braced was several hours.  Up and down a few times.  Nobody was looking confident. 

But the question.... the headers over the second floor windows were way at the top of the wall... several feet above the actual window opening.  Is this normal for a second story?
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#9
I don't think it makes any difference structurally, as long as the headers are designed for intended load/span. Actually, as a side benefit, it allows for a simpler design change of the window height.
Just my $0.02
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#10
(09-23-2022, 05:50 AM)brianwelch Wrote: I don't think it makes any difference structurally, as long as the headers are designed for intended load/span. Actually, as a side benefit, it allows for a simpler design change of the window height.
Just my $0.02

Fair point.
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#11
(09-23-2022, 05:40 AM)KC Wrote: I watched a couple of days of house framing while I was in Kentucky earlier this week (Louisville metro). 

Big Pulte house.   They built the entire two story side wall (with high cielings), house wrapped it, then stood it up with a lift thingy.  That was interesting (scary) to watch.  Not sure they do it like that all the time, because from the first time they started lifting until it was actually up and braced was several hours.  Up and down a few times.  Nobody was looking confident. 

But the question.... the headers over the second floor windows were way at the top of the wall... several feet above the actual window opening.  Is this normal for a second story?

It doesn't matter where they are as long as their over the window. They support the structure above the window.
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#12
When I was doing that I prefered the headers right above the windows. Just my preference. either will meet code and is acceptable. When ceilings are 8' then a 2x12 fills it in down to the perfect height. The style around here now is for a 9' or 10' ceiling on the pricier homes. You see the headers placed wheerever the framer wnts to put them.
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#13
(09-23-2022, 05:40 AM)KC Wrote:    They built the entire two story side wall (with high cielings), house wrapped it, then stood it up with a lift thingy.  That was interesting (scary) to watch.  Not sure they do it like that all the time, because from the first time they started lifting until it was actually up and braced was several hours.  Up and down a few times.  Nobody was looking confident. 

about how long was "entire 2 story wall?"

used to do that quite often with a crane or skytrack. did a lot of homes that had wood soffit, facia, wood siding. wed get everything possible on the walls before raising. took longer to frame than raise. some walls would take 5 or so hours to frame but 30 minutes to raise.
loved doing the fancy schmancy 2 story grand entrance with covered porch walls. pretty wild framing the roof on the wall while it was laying on the ground. helluva lot easier,too.
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#14
(09-25-2022, 11:53 AM)tomsteve Wrote: about how long was "entire 2 story wall?"

used to do that quite often with a crane or skytrack. did a lot of homes that had wood soffit, facia, wood siding. wed get everything possible on the walls before raising. took longer to frame than raise. some walls would take 5 or so hours to frame but 30 minutes to raise.
loved doing the fancy schmancy 2 story grand entrance with covered porch walls. pretty wild framing the roof on the wall while it was laying on the ground. helluva lot easier,too.

I dunno... maybe 50'?  Never saw it before.
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