Got to repair a benchtop today
#11
So on alternate Sundays, I volunteer at the Kansas City Woodworkers' Guild shop. We are there to help with large glue-ups, make sure people don't do something (too) stupid, maintain equipment, etc.

Normally I spend an hour or two doing basic maintenance on the hand tool collection. Cleaning, sharpening, whatever. But I also look after the benches and worktops. I've done several patch jobs in the past. Things happen, chisels, saws, miss-drilled holes...

Today I found what looked like a hole from a router bit, the sort of ragged hole you might expect when setting down a still running router. Whoops!

So quick check with the powers that govern shop use to see if my preferred patch would be OK. Then off to find a bit of walnut, a quick visit to the Noun Project for the appropriate art work and et' viola, it is complete.

   
   


The patching was done with my Shaper Origin. Haven't gotten to use it in a while for a complete "project". Mostly been using it to prototype some patterns for a slowly progressing project. This was fun. I may come back and do some additional details, eyes & mouth, with some maple later.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#12
Looks like a dog did some business on your the benchtop!
Laugh

Simon
Reply
#13
(11-13-2022, 06:11 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: Looks like a dog did some business on your the benchtop!
Laugh

Simon

I learned that the damage was indeed from a router bit still spinning when the router was set down (plunge base). But also learned it had slipped in the collet (another lesson hard learned by the perpetrator). So it really was an "oh s**t" moment for them.

We have a teaching mission as an aspect of the guild so these things happen. No injuries except to pride, some project parts and the bench.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#14
I'm certain I'm missing the "artistic" point, but was there ever a consideration to use the original species of wood for the repair?

Doug
Reply
#15
Feces hapens!!

Gary
I've only had one...in dog beers.

"You can see the stars and still not see the light"
The Eagles: Already Gone
Reply
#16
(11-13-2022, 11:51 PM)Tapper Wrote: I'm certain I'm missing the "artistic" point, but was there ever a consideration to use the original species of wood for the repair?

Doug

Nope. 

After something 20+ patch repairs using oak, ash or maple and circles, rectangles and bowties it is time for something different.

The a primary purpose of the shop and its 22 bench/work surfaces is teaching. The surfaces take a real beating. Router bit and drill bit dings are the most common but there have been track-saw trenches cut the length and width of benches. Corners damaged because people were trying to force together joinery they should have taken more time with. Dogholes splintered at the top surface because they were used for off-label purposes. Miss-fired pin and brad nails are more common than one might suspect when people are learning how to use a nailer.

If I'm going to keep repairing them, I'm going to amuse myself doing it.

Future patch shapes will include ducks, bunnies and various blob shapes.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#17
My primary bench is covered with a layer of 1/4" Masonite.  When it gets all ratted up I replace it.  

John
Reply
#18
1/4" tempered masonite does work very well for a work bench surface. Going on 15 years now and still good shape not good looking. Your patch looks likes a chocolate dipped soft serve ice cream cone.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
Reply
#19
(11-13-2022, 04:44 PM)Rob Young Wrote: So on alternate Sundays, I volunteer at the Kansas City Woodworkers' Guild shop. We are there to help with large glue-ups, make sure people don't do something (too) stupid, maintain equipment, etc.

Normally I spend an hour or two doing basic maintenance on the hand tool collection. Cleaning, sharpening, whatever. But I also look after the benches and worktops. I've done several patch jobs in the past. Things happen, chisels, saws, miss-drilled holes...

Today I found what looked like a hole from a router bit, the sort of ragged hole you might expect when setting down a still running router. Whoops!

So quick check with the powers that govern shop use to see if my preferred patch would be OK. Then off to find a bit of walnut, a quick visit to the Noun Project for the appropriate art work and et' viola, it is complete.





The patching was done with my Shaper Origin. Haven't gotten to use it in a while for a complete "project". Mostly been using it to prototype some patterns for a slowly progressing project. This was fun. I may come back and do some additional details, eyes & mouth, with some maple later.


Rob 
Can you explain how you did this. I can see how being able to make a repair or even a decorative element like this would be useful.
thanks
Reply
#20
(11-14-2022, 10:26 AM)Rob Young Wrote: Nope. 

After something 20+ patch repairs using oak, ash or maple and circles, rectangles and bowties it is time for something different.

The a primary purpose of the shop and its 22 bench/work surfaces is teaching. The surfaces take a real beating. Router bit and drill bit dings are the most common but there have been track-saw trenches cut the length and width of benches. Corners damaged because people were trying to force together joinery they should have taken more time with. Dogholes splintered at the top surface because they were used for off-label purposes. Miss-fired pin and brad nails are more common than one might suspect when people are learning how to use a nailer.

If I'm going to keep repairing them, I'm going to amuse myself doing it.

Future patch shapes will include ducks, bunnies and various blob shapes.

To each his own, I suppose. Whatever it takes to keep you amused.

Doug
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.