Smoke Detector Issue
#18
(11-23-2022, 10:42 AM)pconroy Wrote: I've replaced mine every ten years and the last time was a few months ago. New units, new batteries and of the 15 or so that were new -- two consistently would go off with a spurious alarm.

Wow, that's a lot of alarms for one house.
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#19
(11-23-2022, 11:04 AM)joe1086 Wrote: Wow, that's a lot of alarms for one house.

Finished basement adds to the total.
"This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this Administration will not be re-elected.

Then it will be my duty to so co-operate with the President-elect, as to save the Union between the election and the inauguration."

Abraham Lincoln
1864
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#20
Not sure about your state but the growing trend is Smoke and Carbon monoxide detectors on every level. And smoke detectors in every bedroom. The ones on the bedroom level should be "near" the bedroom doors. Try to replace with the same brand so you don't have to install new connectors. 10 year, sealed Lithium-Ion batteries is also the trend. I say trend because it isn't a nat'l code yet but it may be code in your state or jurisdiction. So any time you remodel or alter an area of the house, it should meet code. Replacement of a detector is altering an area. Carbon Monoxide detectors may be required even if you don't have a garage or fossil fuel appliances. They are required here in Maryland.
Neil Summers Home Inspections




I came to a stop sign and a skanky tweaker chick in a tube top climbed out of the brush and propositioned me.  She looked like she didn't have any teeth so I counted that as a plus.


... Kizar Sosay





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#21
(11-22-2022, 07:15 PM)matthewstimp Wrote: Interesting...ok, maybe I'll just replace them all...not like it is bad money spent. 

Matt

Most detector instructions tell you to replace them in 10 years anyway. The sensor gets dirty and corroded and less effective. Best not to install them near supply registers. They get dirtier faster.
Neil Summers Home Inspections




I came to a stop sign and a skanky tweaker chick in a tube top climbed out of the brush and propositioned me.  She looked like she didn't have any teeth so I counted that as a plus.


... Kizar Sosay





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#22
Most detectors have a manufacture date on the back. I strongly second the recommendation of getting a CO detector as well.


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#23
And grab a big pack of 9V batteries. The Kidde branded batteries last 93 days from initial installation.
"This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this Administration will not be re-elected.

Then it will be my duty to so co-operate with the President-elect, as to save the Union between the election and the inauguration."

Abraham Lincoln
1864
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#24
If you are getting an occasional red light check the manual to see what it means.

Also make sure you have some photoelectric type in the house to detect smoldering fires. The ionization ones are awful at that type of fire. I saw a demo once where my company built a small room, filled it with different types of smoke detectors, put a firefighter inside, and put plastic sheeting over the door opening. The firefighter started a smoldering fire, then started grabbing detectors when they went off and handed them outside via a small hole in the room. Many of the ionization ones had still not gone off after the room was filled with enough smoke it was hard to see the firefighter inside.

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