need suggestions
#10
I am making a snowman out of a spalted maple log for our daughter. She has a nice collection. 

My snowman measures 22x12 with the outside mostly done. I have reached the length limit of any of my chisels.  I'm only into the middle section maybe a third of the way. By accident the bottom is a 6 inch hole. Had a catch. The side walls are roughly 3/16 up about 4 inches. My steady rest is maxed out, it is smallish.

I'm afraid to reach in the hole to try to get more and with the thin wood at the opening I'm not sure about using my cole jaws and turning it around. The hat will be seperate and pine as I will paint it black.

I don't want to buy a probably one time use tool to hog in deeper but I would like to lighten the weight by trying to take out more. 

Thanks for any suggestions.
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#11
Could you flip it around and mount it on a jam chuck and then hollow the head?
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#12
A large Forstner bit (say, 3"). a Forstner bit extension, and a drill chuck for the tailstock would be a good way to go.

If you do not already have one, a tailstock drill chuck is very useful for lots of projects.

The Forstner bit extension will probably see use in the future if you do pepper mills.

The large Forstner bit can be very helpful in doing prep for bowls. Use a slow lathe speed and clear the sawdust/shavings often.

Depending on how deep you need to go, the drill chuck might give you enough depth that you don't need the extension.

Keep some back pressure on the chuck so that it does not pull out of the MT. I have not found an MT2 drill chuck tapped for a draw bar.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#13
(12-01-2022, 06:32 PM)iclark Wrote: I have not found an MT2 drill chuck tapped for a draw bar.

I have one but don't want to sidetrack the conversation. I'll start another post about it.

The reason a drawbar typically won't work on a tailstock like it does on a headstock is that the length between the quill and the crank changes so a drawbar would have to change too. This is just what the drawbar will not do.

I agree with using a big forstner bit in the tailstock to clean out waste wood.
We do segmented turning, not because it is easy, but because it is hard.
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#14
Thank you for your suggestions. I used them.

I have an extension that I used for peppermills and a 2 1/2 inch forstner. The 3 in. of the bit length and my 6 in. extension plus the length of my jacobs chuck 3 3/4 in.  I was able to drill a 3 inch deep  hole in the middle section. I turned a 4x4 piece of pine with a 2 1/2 slightly tapered tenon. I turned the snowman around and a little hot glue jammed it on the tenon. Used the tail stock to center the head end and pushed it on with the tail stock. Very minimum wobble. I finished hollowing down to the tenon. Got it sanded and started putting a finish. I'll pour some acetone inside to soften the glue and remove the jam piece. I'll start on the base next then the hat, eyes, nose and mouth. Probably not put arms on it.

Thanks again.
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#15
That sounds like good progress.

I hope that you will post some pics.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#16
I've tried to post pictures. My server is just barely above dial up out here. Downloads take just short of forever. I could get faster for more dollars a month, but I found for what little we use the computer it's not worth the trouble. Don't even try to post pics anymore. We also cut the cable and do just dandy.
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#17
On behalf of myself and others, I am sorry to hear that about your bandwidth.

I am glad that you still get to participate here.

If you do need/want to post a pic in the future (and it would be a help to you), feel free to PM me and I will send you my home email address.

thanks,
Ivan
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#18
(12-05-2022, 02:17 AM)iclark Wrote: That sounds like good progress.

I hope that you will post some pics.

I would to
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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