Safe Drivers
#21
(01-05-2023, 11:15 AM)SceneryMaker Wrote: Is it possible that he is looking for a pointy drive center that he can easily move around to find the best axis for turning like Lyle Jameson frequently does?

this was my initial thought as well.  maybe just a dead center to find that point of balance you're looking for, then the cup center.
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#22
(01-04-2023, 02:13 PM)greenacres2 Wrote: The Robust cup center that I use is not spring loaded and works great.  In use, seems like the spring would not be relevant once the cup is seated.  Only advantage I can think of is in positioning the work piece initially, but I could be wrong.  I used Stebs for several years, but rarely since getting my first cup center.  Very rarely, like in I should sell (but won’t…just because!!)
Earl

yep, the initial positioning is the benefit of the spring . . . at least for me.  
Big Grin
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#23
once you find the center you're happy with, you could also drill into the blank maybe 1/4" or so to "seat" the cup center (just snug on the outside).  will still free-spin if there's a nasty catch, but shouldn't go flyin' off.
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#24
(01-05-2023, 11:15 AM)SceneryMaker Wrote: Is it possible that he is looking for a pointy drive center that he can easily move around to find the best axis for turning like Lyle Jameson frequently does?
Let's not drag Jameson into this: in his videos you can see him using a traditional 4 spur drive center. He 'doesn't want the wood to move'.

So pointy: yes, but safe driver: no


Laugh

-Mark
If I had a signature, this wouldn't be it.
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#25
(01-05-2023, 11:15 AM)SceneryMaker Wrote: Is it possible that he is looking for a pointy drive center that he can easily move around to find the best axis for turning like Lyle Jameson frequently does?

Yes that is what I am looking for.  I have tried it on 2 blanks.  It worked and I understand the physics but it was still cheek clenching to do that.  I am hoping the safety center helps reduce the danger of a catch over a spur center.  I like the idea of a small recess for the cup.  I might even do 1 on each side of the blank, one for the cup and one for some pin jaws.

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#26
The safest is a live center at both ends
Crazy
If it don't hold soup, it's ART!!

Dry Creek Woodturning

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#27

Big Grin Actually the one I have is a live center. Works great for balancing the blank, less so for turning.

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#28
I belive that those safe drivers are only meant for spindle work.
I would stick with the faceplate for bowl blanks.
You could mount the blank on the lathe between a drive center and a live center and then turn it by hand to get it balanced and mark the center for your faceplate to be mounted.
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#29
(01-08-2023, 01:02 AM)AnthonyYak Wrote: The safest is a live center at both ends
Crazy

^^^^^^^ what he said

(01-08-2023, 07:49 PM)crokett™ Wrote:
Big Grin Actually the one I have is a live center.  Works great for balancing the blank, less so for turning.

That is all I use is live center at one end and a steb center at the other and I turn very out of balance firewood and big rounds cut in half and mostly crotch wood which is the worst.  Ever since Lyle Jamieson come to my house three times and Rudy Lopez and Jimmy Clewes all shown me the same way.  

I take a like cuts with a heavy bowl gouge and mine is 5/8 and cut into the wood from the side or sometimes straight into the wood and to the side but all are light cuts and speed turned down so the lathe does not shake.  

Every few cuts I check and tighten the tailstock if it needs it and that is all.

Hope that helps and Yes all of those guys did come to my shop and did 1 to 3 lessons to me and any vet that was there.

   

Me in the blue and I lost 52 pounds since then.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#30
(01-11-2023, 06:04 AM)Dusty Workshop Wrote: I belive that those safe drivers are only meant for spindle work.
I would stick with the faceplate for bowl blanks.
You could mount the blank on the lathe between a drive center and a live center and then turn it by hand to get it balanced and mark the center for your faceplate to be mounted.

I tried that.  Didn't work as well as I'd hoped.  The chainsaw operator wasn't the best and the blank was still heavier on one side because it wasn't angled between the centers to compensate.  I've roughed 3 bowls with turning between centers and so far it's worked pretty well.  It makes me much more aware of where the tool is (trying to minimize catches, etc) and I sharpen more frequently which is also a good thing.   I just finished a piece of hickory that had been roughed with a chainsaw long enough ago that I basically turning a solid piece of dry hickory.  It turned into a beautiful bowl.  The upside of making sure I had a sharp tool and paying attention to tool control was the quickest sanding job I think I have ever done.

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