Dadonator XL
#7
I've got a Freud dado set for my Saw Stop and have generally been happy with it. However, is does leave "scribe" cuts from the outer edge of the stack. I'm beginning a project building a Greene and Greene style chest of drawers, with the extended fingers on the drawer fronts. The Greene and Greene book I purchased describes the technique for the finger joints using a table saw, and the "scribe cut" left by the Freud set would be visible and totally unacceptable. I recently got a catalog in the mail for Infinity tools, and the description of the Dadonator XL dado set sounds like it would work very nicely for this use. I'd be interested in hearing feedback from folks who've used this dado set for a while. I found some reviews online and they were generally quite positive. An added feature of this set is that it was designed specifically for the Saw Stop saws, where full body chippers are not to be used due to their weight.
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#8
I saw that set in the new catalog, and thought it had just been released. If true there may not be a lot of experience behind it. But I would think someone would know if the claims (and they do sound good) are true. You might consider a box joint set of blades (less costly) if this will be something you do a lot of...they eliminate the 'devils ears" that most dado sets have. Should you get the XL set I'd be interested to hear your opinion of it.
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#9
If you're doing large box joints look at the WS jig. Uses a router rather than a blade. I built a 24" version for making toy boxes. Lot cheaper and the results are perfect. Built mine from left over stock.
Roger


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#10
(01-24-2023, 09:57 AM)firefighter Wrote: If you're doing large box joints look at the WS jig. Uses a router rather than a blade. I built a 24" version for making toy boxes. Lot cheaper and the results are perfect. Built mine from left over stock.

I've got a Leigh mortise and tenon jig that should be able to handle the job, but I've found that the router bits (and I've tried straight bits and both up and down spiral) bits, some brand new,  tend to result in some tear-out on black walnut, and the present project will be walnut.
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#11
I can't speak to the Dadonator XL, but I have an older CMT set and it does not leave any "devil's ears" at all. I don't know if the newer models are the same or not.
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#12
I've got a Forrest Dado King that leaves bat wings. When such things matter, I run my dadoes a little shallow and then use a router plane to clean them up. No experience with the Dadonator, but like Fred, I'd be curious to hear your opinion if you go that route.
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