A Proper Miter Shooting Board
#10
Finally got around to constructing a proper miter shooting board. As is normally the case, it takes longer than you might think, but the effort was worth it.

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#11
Phillip, nice work,  I like that you put in an ability to extend the sides as the edges get chewed up.
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#12
(01-25-2023, 07:43 PM)barryvabeach Wrote: Phillip, nice work,  I like that you put in an ability to extend the sides as the edges get chewed up.

I'd love to take credit for that detail, but the inspiration for this feature came from John Teneyck
(jteneyck) who made a series of posts some time ago related to a shooting board he designed and sells.
Here is link to one of his posts:

https://forums.woodnet.net/showthread.ph...ting+board
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#13
Good job! Is that a LN No. 9? If so, they don't make them anymore - replaced by their No. 51.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#14
(01-29-2023, 09:07 AM)AHill Wrote: Good job!  Is that a LN No. 9?  If so, they don't make them anymore - replaced by their No. 51.

That is indeed a LN No. 9 which is no longer made. The key thing about the no. 9 is that the side handle can be placed on either the right or left hand side, allowing shooting from either end of the shoot board shown above. The 51 is a one trick pony: my 51 is of the right hand variety so it can operate from left to right on the board above. You would need the 51 left hand version to shoot the opposite way.

Miter shooting seems simple until you introduce a profiled work piece, such as decorative trim piece installed using either inside or outside miters. I am exploring all the options to handle those occasions as we speak.
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#15
(01-29-2023, 10:50 AM)Philip1231 Wrote: Miter shooting seems simple until you introduce a profiled work piece, such as decorative trim piece installed using either inside or outside miters. I am exploring all the options to handle those occasions as we speak.

I find a strip of sandpaper adhered to the fence keeps the workpiece steady.  Something like 120 or 220 grit.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#16
I sold my LN #9 last winter for $650.00. To me, it was awkward to use. I have an LV miter shooting plane (no longer made) that is much more comfortable.
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
www.metaltech-pm.com
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#17
Hi Phil!

I love to see bright clear pictures of tools in work. Especially such nice working tools as your shooting board!

Take Care,
Pedder
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#18
(Yesterday, 04:32 AM)Pedder Wrote: Hi Phil!

I love to see bright clear pictures of tools in work. Especially such nice working tools as your shooting board!

Take Care,
Pedder

Pedder:

I am glad you appreciate the "art" I try to create when I take these photos. I was trying to capture evidence of how well the plane sliced through the maple, leaving an onion-skin shaving. With an iPhone, anyone can look like a pro photographer!

Best

Phil
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