I need a mini table saw
#11
I have begun to make small jewelry boxes- using 1/4" - 3/8" material.   I find that my large table saw is a bit bulky for this detail work.   Although I have made several jigs to have accurate miter corners, I wish that I had a small bench saw to do this intricate work.   Something with a 6"-ish blade.    I tried using my hand plane with shooting boards, would rather a precise machine.   ANY IDEAS?   Anyone use a smaller TS for detail work?
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#12
I know nothing about them, but I have heard others mention that Proxxon tools are popular with model builders.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

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#13
(10-17-2023, 03:00 PM)AlanS Wrote: I have begun to make small jewelry boxes- using 1/4" - 3/8" material.   I find that my large table saw is a bit bulky for this detail work.   Although I have made several jigs to have accurate miter corners, I wish that I had a small bench saw to do this intricate work.   Something with a 6"-ish blade.    I tried using my hand plane with shooting boards, would rather a precise machine.   ANY IDEAS?   Anyone use a smaller TS for detail work?

You will never be able to obtain the precision and cut quality of a shooting board with a machine.  My advice is to use your current TS with a mini sled for rough cuts and then a good shooting board and low angle bench plane, like the LN No. 62, to bring them to final dimension.  

John
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#14
For model and miniature work take a look at the Byrnes Model Machine table saw. It’s a great tool for that purpose (and the drum sander is amazing as well).
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#15
(10-17-2023, 03:00 PM)AlanS Wrote: I have begun to make small jewelry boxes- using 1/4" - 3/8" material.   I find that my large table saw is a bit bulky for this detail work.   Although I have made several jigs to have accurate miter corners, I wish that I had a small bench saw to do this intricate work.   Something with a 6"-ish blade.    I tried using my hand plane with shooting boards, would rather a precise machine.   ANY IDEAS?   Anyone use a smaller TS for detail work?

jointmaker pro?
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#16
Just a thought, how about a 10" jobsite table saw with a 7 1/4" blade on it? Smaller table size, smaller blade, maybe.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#17
IF you can find one, a printer's saw seems to me to be the perfect tool for that.  Maybe with a custom ground blade.  But they are heavy, smooth running and accurate.  I saw a half dozen of them sell last summer at auction but have never seen another opportunity or I'd own one I think.

Example:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dSgXxmpB-8
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#18
(10-20-2023, 06:14 PM)museumguy Wrote: Just a thought, how about a 10" jobsite table saw with a 7 1/4" blade on it? Smaller table size, smaller blade, maybe.

It doesn't help with table size but I've run 7 1/4" diablo blades from Home Depot on a Grizzly 1023. I find it less aggressive and smoother running than regular 10" blades in 40 -60 tooth configuration. I only use these for thin fragile cuts though they'll cut up to 3/4 or so fine. There are different tooth counts and grinds. And I don't have to send them out to have sharpened. Smaller diameter so the rim speed is lower so feed slower but for the kind of work these blades are best for a slower feed rate is desirable.
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#19
Have a look here: https://www.micromark.com
and here:

https://craftisian.com/projects/12854-mi...ci-inserts

These folks might have the experience you want.
Gary

Please don’t quote the trolls.
Liberty, Freedom and Individual Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
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#20
I've ran a 7-1/4" multitooth blade on my 3hp Grizzly before. It's smooth...
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
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