Simple framing question
#11
Hi, I have an awkward space in my house where I need to frame an opening, like a door way but 11' wide. There is already a wing wall on one side so will be adding a 5" wide (just enough for casing) or so wing wall on the opposite side and a header that drops down from the ceiling about 12". I have pulled drywall and added blocking. need to make the header portion which will be like a 2x6 ladder, 11" wide total and thus 8" blocking in between. 

I don't have a framing nailer so usually use deck screws but need to try it out to see if it will split the blocking between the 2x6's. Don't know much about framing but it seems they nail like that all the time. I may also get some metal 90 deg brackets, only a $1.50 ea. Of course the ends of the 12' 2x6's will be well screwed into a stud on the walls but still want this rigid to avoid drywall joint cracking. 

Is predrill, screw good enough or should I add reinforcement of some kind?

Thanks


Attached Files Image(s)
   
Reply
#12
If I understand things correctly, you want to use that structure as an 11' header supported at the ends. The 2x6's laying flat have very little resistance to bending. That will have very little structure strength. Is this load bearing support? Place a 2x6 flat on a couple of chairs at the ends and push down on the center to see the deflection. The members need to have the wide dimension in the vertical plane. You would be better off with a couple of 2x12's for the header.
Reply
#13
I knew when I posted that I should not have used header to describe it. It's just decorative like this picture from one of my trim books (Decorating with Architectural Trimwork by Silber). They call it a passageway. Mine will not be that fancy, just jamb + casing.

The ceiling addition is running parallel to the joists so I did add 4 blockings to attach the ladder to the celling. I wont test them with my entire body weight hanging but they seem fine. Even with drywall, jamb and casing I dont think the whole thing will be even 100 lbs.

I think if I screw into the ends of the blocks and also toe-screw them it will be fine.

My house is somewhat modern and there was another 4' wide doorway (no door) with drywall jambs. Makes the baseboard really awkward and also if the rooms are different colors it does not look right. So I added jamb + casing and looks sooo much better. This current room has a 2' wide wing wall so they kind of tried to add some separation but a wing wall is almost worse than nothing.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
Reply
#14
No worries using screws. I would suggest structural screws instead of deck screws. I prefer torx drive

Reply
#15
(11-04-2023, 06:29 PM)goaliedad Wrote: No worries using screws. I would suggest structural screws instead of deck screws. I prefer torx drive

+1

Home Depot
Neil Summers Home Inspections




I came to a stop sign and a skanky tweaker chick in a tube top climbed out of the brush and propositioned me.  She looked like she didn't have any teeth so I counted that as a plus.


... Kizar Sosay





Reply
#16
(11-04-2023, 06:29 PM)goaliedad Wrote: No worries using screws. I would suggest structural screws instead of deck screws. I prefer torx drive

+1

5" GRX


If I were building it, I would probably build an open web truss. It would provide more sag resistance and you would never have to shoot a screw into the end grain so you'd get more fastening strength because your screws would be grabbing a cross grain. Might use a 5-1/8" structural screw because you will install them at a right angle to the web. I think a 4" would be too short for a good bite.

I was hoping I had a graphic of an open web but I don't. I found this pic on the web. It's an open web floor joist but basically what I am talking about.

[Image: e7GljMs.png]
Neil Summers Home Inspections




I came to a stop sign and a skanky tweaker chick in a tube top climbed out of the brush and propositioned me.  She looked like she didn't have any teeth so I counted that as a plus.


... Kizar Sosay





Reply
#17
(11-03-2023, 02:18 PM)alexh1 Wrote: Hi, I have an awkward space in my house where I need to frame an opening, like a door way but 11' wide. There is already a wing wall on one side so will be adding a 5" wide (just enough for casing) or so wing wall on the opposite side and a header that drops down from the ceiling about 12". I have pulled drywall and added blocking. need to make the header portion which will be like a 2x6 ladder, 11" wide total and thus 8" blocking in between. 

I don't have a framing nailer so usually use deck screws but need to try it out to see if it will split the blocking between the 2x6's. Don't know much about framing but it seems they nail like that all the time. I may also get some metal 90 deg brackets, only a $1.50 ea. Of course the ends of the 12' 2x6's will be well screwed into a stud on the walls but still want this rigid to avoid drywall joint cracking. 

Is predrill, screw good enough or should I add reinforcement of some kind?

Thanks

Yea, they do. And if you don't have a framing gun handy, try a hammer. (We're only talking about a few dozen nails.) I'd still screw the framing assembly to the ceiling (in case someone hangs an infant jumper or punching bag from it) but by the time the drywall is mounted and casing installed it really wouldn't even need any cripple studs to hold it up there. If you're really worried about it, hang it with 3/8" threaded rod. Four of them will hold over a ton!
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply
#18
(11-04-2023, 10:51 PM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: Yea, they do. And if you don't have a framing gun handy, try a hammer. (We're only talking about a few dozen nails.) I'd still screw the framing assembly to the ceiling (in case someone hangs an infant jumper or punching bag from it) but by the time the drywall is mounted and casing installed it really wouldn't even need any cripple studs to hold it up there. If you're really worried about it, hang it with 3/8" threaded rod. Four of them will hold over a ton!

The piece would parallel the joists above. He'll most likely need to get inside the ceiling and install nailers between the joists above. Unless he gets lucky and has a joist above it.
Neil Summers Home Inspections




I came to a stop sign and a skanky tweaker chick in a tube top climbed out of the brush and propositioned me.  She looked like she didn't have any teeth so I counted that as a plus.


... Kizar Sosay





Reply
#19
Thanks all, I did add blocking in the ceiling. I was able to do this by just making a 6"x10" or so hole in the drywall and screwing with a long bit (so I would not have do any celling drywall repair) My fears were unfounded as when I hit the addition with my fist its like hitting a log.

As for the drywall, I have done many patches but this is first time doing sheets with butt joints and inside corners. I have the book "Drywall: Hanging and Taping: Professional Techniques for Walls & Ceiling" which is an excellent book btw and carefully reading each section for every step things went fairly smoothly.

I was going to call someone in for the orange peel texture buts its only about 50 sq ft so I bought a Wallpro texture gun. They have very detailed instructions with all of the settings for each level of texture. I practiced on some scrap and the orange peel settings looked much too rough so I used the settings/tip for fine texture, sprayed the walls but as it dried it shrank about 50% ending up closer to fine texture so it appears the gun instructions are correct.

I'm using topping compound, is it expected that the texture will shrink about 50% as it dries?

I'll do another test and let it dry before evaluating.
Reply
#20
I bought my texture gun on Amazon for about $40. Use it a lot more than I expected. Never had a problem texture shrinking, or maybe I never noticed it. It looks decent when I’m done.

I really don’t like texture, but that’s what every house here has.
VH07V  
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.