Threaded inserts in Ash
#5
Building a standing tall dressing mirror and was at the point to create the pivot using brass threaded inserts.  I could not get the insert to thread into the ash frame.

I tried extra inserts on scrap wood and ended up breaking the brass when I applied enough force to get the insert to engage the hardwood.

What's the secret? drill slightly oversize?

I ended up just tapping the ash directly and screwing into the wood.  I made the threaded depth over an inch and a quarter deep to compensate and give the screws more threads to engage.
WoodNET... the new safespace
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#6
(12-04-2023, 08:44 AM)Splinter Puller Wrote: Building a standing tall dressing mirror and was at the point to create the pivot using brass threaded inserts.  I could not get the insert to thread into the ash frame.

I tried extra inserts on scrap wood and ended up breaking the brass when I applied enough force to get the insert to engage the hardwood.

What's the secret? drill slightly oversize?

I ended up just tapping the ash directly and screwing into the wood.  I made the threaded depth over an inch and a quarter deep to compensate and give the screws more threads to engage.

What size insert and what size drill are you using.  The drill size is always larger than the insert size.  Are you using a screwdriver to drive them or a bolt with nut and washer to drive them ?    Roly
  This chart may help   Insert chart
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#7
I can't find it right now, but someone did an experiment comparing threaded inserts to just drilling an undersize hole and  and screwing directly into the wood, and found that screwing directly into the wood was just as good as long as you had a deep enough hole. Of course the type of insert and the type of wood can change the results.

Here it is
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4SnrbGwGpI


WoodcraftBySuman
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#8
I always drilled a tad bigger than what the insert called for. Used wax as a lube, then used a bolt with nut to screw it in with.
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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