Cordless Nailer Recommendations?
#11
I have a trim project coming up that I want to use as an excuse to upgrade my pneumatic trim nailer. I have a decent pneumatic nailer, but I hate lugging my air compressor to the work area. My AC is a tweener, too small to do much but too big to lug around. I've done a little research and decided DeWalt or Milwaukee are the brands I'm looking at to go cordless. The options I'm considering are:

Milwaukee M18 15ga finish nailer- $329 w/out battery/ $399 w/ battery. I don't own any M18 batteries so I'll either have to buy with battery or buy a DeWalt or Makita to Milwaukee battery adapter
DeWalt 16 ga finish nailer- $295
Bauer cordless air compressor w/ 2 3aH batteries- $250 w/ current pneumatic nailer. I could use current Bauer batteries I have, but at some point will want to buy 2 dedicated batteries if I buy this compressor.

The air compressor is appealing to me as I would have a small portable AC for airing up tires and odd jobs away from a convenient power source. Also, $250 is closer to the budget I wanted to spend, but I'd rather buy once, cry once to buy something I won't regret so if the Milwaukee is a clear winner I don't mind going that route. Looking for any opinions or recommendations.
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#12
I am a Makita fan. I always wanted a Makita 23g micro nailer. The reviews haven't always been favorable. Last spring, I got an email for a refurbished version. I bought it one and it is fantastic. I guess my answer is to look at a refurbished version of the nailer that you want. It worked for me.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#13
Milwaukee all the way.
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#14
(01-03-2024, 08:26 PM)museumguy Wrote: I am a Makita fan. I always wanted a Makita 23g micro nailer. The reviews haven't always been favorable. Last spring, I got an email for a refurbished version. I bought it one and it is fantastic. I guess my answer is to look at a refurbished version of the nailer that you want. It worked for me.

Also a Makita fan and I already have plenty of batteries, AND I did see an ad for a refurbished finish nailer that was in my budget. That said, it looked clunky and awkward and like you said the reviews were mostly bad. I'll put them back in contender status.

Full disclosure, I really want to justify buying the Milwaukee. I'm not on the Milwaukee 18 platform and I'm trying to stay out of another mfg system, but their nailers get consistently good reviews and once I get into the system it gives me some more options for buying bare tools down the road. I bought a Ryobi cordless years ago but trying to sink 2"ers into hardwood flooring was too much for that nailer so I took it back. I do enough small one-off trim/ general repair that I really need to get a gun I can grab and sink 20-50 nails and be done.
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#15
I really like my 1.5 gallion california air compressor small and light and quite.  I can use multi air tools witout buying all new.
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#16
(01-04-2024, 12:38 PM)fixtureman Wrote: I really like my 1.5 gallion california air compressor small and light and quite.  I can use multi air tools witout buying all new.
I recently got a 1 gallon California to use for blowing chips and dust out of my workpieces, but I bet it will work fine for nails.  Man is that thing quiet.  I'm going to sell my Dewalt compressor.
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#17
(01-04-2024, 11:50 AM)ajkoontz Wrote: Also a Makita fan and I already have plenty of batteries, AND I did see an ad for a refurbished finish nailer that was in my budget. That said, it looked clunky and awkward and like you said the reviews were mostly bad. I'll put them back in contender status.

Full disclosure, I really want to justify buying the Milwaukee. I'm not on the Milwaukee 18 platform and I'm trying to stay out of another mfg system, but their nailers get consistently good reviews and once I get into the system it gives me some more options for buying bare tools down the road. I bought a Ryobi cordless years ago but trying to sink 2"ers into hardwood flooring was too much for that nailer so I took it back. I do enough small one-off trim/ general repair that I really need to get a gun I can grab and sink 20-50 nails and be done.

Look on amazon and see if there’s an adapter to use the Makita batteries with Milwaukee tools.

I have mostly dewalt batteries and was able to find an Adapter to use my dewalt batteries with some Bauer tools from harbor freight.

One of the options I considered was getting a Bauer battery operated compressor for running nail and brad guns since I already have a bunch of air operated ones.  
But if I need to go remote, I already have a kit that kobalt sold years ago to use a paintball gun tank that you can hang from your belt and it regulates it down to where you can run nail guns off of it.

The only problem with that is refilling the paintball gun tanks, as they take north of 3000 psi.
And you can either go get them refilled at sporting goods store or buy a small Chinese compressor that goes up to 4500psi although I am frankly more than a little scared of that kind of air pressure.
Especially when delivered by a very low cost Chinese compressor…
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#18
I have a 16 and a8 gauge Dewalt and if I were to do it again, I would go Milwaukee.
"There is no such thing as stupid questions, just stupid people"
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#19
Don't count out Ryobi. My buddy uses Ryobi exclusively and swears by them. I have a Makita battery adapter for Ryobi tools. I just picked up a Ryobi 16g nail gun from Direct tools for $139. Gonna give it a whirl.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#20
I'm heavily invested in air guns and as long as I can get repair parts for them I'll stay the course.
I can see the advantage of not having a hose to deal with but I've dealt with cords and hoses all my life, so not a big deal to me.
I haven't gotten the cordless bug like you younger guys.....yet. Drills, yes, but I still have my corded drills and shear.
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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