Stair Railing
#11
My wife's christmas present was replacing the builder grade stair mismatched stair railings with something custom.  The railings and newel post are walnut.  The balusters are poplar.   Hopefully the links work.  It is not easy to share photos here.  With the file size limits if I download them and try to put them in as attachments I have to resize them all to fit under the size limits.    I used my 3D printer as part of this project.  Mostly because I could I modeled and printed angle gauges to make sure I got all the angles correct.  I built the assembly with the newel post and balusters before I installed it.  


railing and balusters.  I still need to put poly on the walnut. 
https://share.icloud.com/photos/01cUcJkD...qnbozh-urQ

newel post detail
https://share.icloud.com/photos/032F9tiO...M2tisaKwAQ

hand rail, after removing the old rail and patching and painting the wall.  I still need to stain and put poly on this rail.  
https://share.icloud.com/photos/08a8U58e...t-QUW2a1nQ

the entire project.    
https://share.icloud.com/photos/0bdYr4ly...JhosJ4sHvA

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#12
Nice work.  I don't know what state you live in, but the handrails don't look like they meet the national code.  The old one on the wall looks like it did in terms of cross section, though it doesn't return to the wall, which it should.  You can do anything you want, but if they don't meet code and someone gets hurt, you run the risk of a lawsuit.  You run that risk anyway, but if the railings don't meet code you are much more likely to be liable.  Also, if/when you go to sell the house, any non-compliance is likely to come up.  Here in NYS, whatever was there when the house was built generally gets grand fathered, but if you touch it, it has to be brought up to current code.   

John  
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#13
I like it. Great job
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#14
(01-03-2024, 07:21 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Nice work.  I don't know what state you live in, but the handrails don't look like they meet the national code.  The old one on the wall looks like it did in terms of cross section, though it doesn't return to the wall, which it should.  You can do anything you want, but if they don't meet code and someone gets hurt, you run the risk of a lawsuit.  You run that risk anyway, but if the railings don't meet code you are much more likely to be liable.  Also, if/when you go to sell the house, any non-compliance is likely to come up.  Here in NYS, whatever was there when the house was built generally gets grand fathered, but if you touch it, it has to be brought up to current code.   

John  

Why would it be necessary to return the wall?  It would look better, but the reason for 'necessary' escapes me...
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#15
(01-04-2024, 06:35 AM)KC Wrote: Why would it be necessary to return the wall?  It would look better, but the reason for 'necessary' escapes me...

Code .   Roly
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#16
(01-04-2024, 06:35 AM)KC Wrote: Why would it be necessary to return the wall?  It would look better, but the reason for 'necessary' escapes me...

I'm wrong more often than being correct...but where I live, the "return to the wall" may be commercial.  I've installed several handrails without the return to the wall.  Who knows, I may be some "call backs" tomorrow.
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#17
(01-04-2024, 06:35 AM)KC Wrote: Why would it be necessary to return the wall?  It would look better, but the reason for 'necessary' escapes me...

my understanding is the return may prevent injuries from a strap or similar getting looped over the end of the rail and caught on the way up or down the stairs.

the new railing does return to the wall, and is the max cross section allowed so should meet code, if it were ever checked.  where I live though, I don't think that will be an issue.  beside which we aren't selling the house any time soon.

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#18
Turned out quite nice. Well done!
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#19
Looks great. Well done! Going to put up a matching rail on the wall?
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#20
(01-04-2024, 01:00 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Looks great. Well done! Going to put up a matching rail on the wall?

There is a matching rail on the wall.  

https://share.icloud.com/photos/08a8U58e...t-QUW2a1nQ

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